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Links

Apollodorus’ Library
(http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/Texts/
apollod.summ.html#part1)

Read section 1 of Frazier’s Summary of Apollodorus handbook of mythology dealing with Jason and the Argonauts. At any point you can click on the reference number in the text to take you to the fuller treatment in Apollodorus himself.

Gaia
(http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/GML/Gaia.html)
Here we see Gaia surrounded by images of fecundity and a brief discussion of the mythology in which she figures.

Eros
(http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/artifactSearch?q=Eros&artifact=yes&artifactType=Vase)

Here you will find a nice selection of vases from Perseus in which the god Eros figures. Read the vase descriptions and click on the images of those which interest you. (Note: Not all of the images may be available to you.)

Birth of Venus
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/47/
La_nascita_di_Venere_%28Botticelli%29.jpg)

Botticelli’s famous Birth of Venus (Wikipedia).

Eos/Vases
(http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/artifactBrowser?object=Vase&field=Keyword&keyclass=Divinities&keyword=Eos)

Here you will find a nice selection of vases from Perseus in which the goddess Eos figures. Read the vase descriptions and click on the images of those which interest you. (Note: Not all of the images may be available to you.)

Selene
(http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/GML/Selene.html)

Here in this drawing of a classical vase painting, Selene, like her counterpart Helius, the sun-god, drives her chariot across the sky. As a lesser light her chariot is drawn by only two horses. Note the Moon-crown upon her head.

Oceanus
(http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/GML/Oceanus.html)

An ancient sculpture of the god Oceanos who encircles the world. He is somewhat unkempt and his beard and locks are encrusted with sea creatures.

Saturn Devouring His Son
(http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/goya/)

Scroll down and click on Goya’s haunting masterpiece of Saturn/Cronus eating his children. It is a remarkable rendering of mindless, brute force savagely safeguarding itself against a loss of control.


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