We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
masthead
 

Chapter 3

Rhythm

Sound Example 3.1 A simple Western European folk melody (K0016), corresponding to Figure 3.1 (p. 99).

Sound Example 3.2 K0016 played twice, with two different indications of the beat (p. 100).

Sound Example 3.3 A strongly metrical rhythmic pattern (p. 101).

Sound Example 3.4 A weakly metrical (syncopated) rhythmic pattern, with frequent "silent beats" containing no events (p. 101).

Sound Example 3.5 A sentence of British English and a sentence of continental French, corresponding to Figures 3.8a and 3.8b (pp. 130, 131).

3.5A English sentence
3.5B French sentence

Sound Example 3.6 An English sentence transformed from its original version into an increasingly abstract temporal pattern of vowels and consonants. See text for details (p. 136). Courtesy of Franck Ramus.

3.6A Original sentence
3.6B Saltanaj
3.6C Sasasa
3.6D Flat sasasa

Sound Example 3.7 A Japanese sentence transformed from its original version into an increasingly abstract temporal pattern of vowels and consonants. See text for details (p. 136). Courtesy of Franck Ramus.

3.7A Original sentence
3.7B Saltanaj
3.7C Sasasa
3.7D Flat sasasa

Sound Example 3.8 A sentence of British English and of a sentence of continental French, corresponding to Figure 3.15 (pp. 162, 163).

3.8A English sentence
3.8B French sentence

Sound Example 3.9 Easter song from the Bolivian Andes, played on a small guitar (charango). At the end of the excerpt, one can hear the local musicians clap the beat. Courtesy of Ian Cross (p. 169).

Sound Example 3.10 Examples of tone sequences in which tones alternate in amplitude or duration (p. 170).

3.10A Alternating amplitude
3.10B Alternating duration



Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy
Please send comments or suggestions about this Website to custserv.us@oup.com        
cover