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Cover

Visual Worlds

Looking, Images, Visual Disciplines

James Elkins and Erna Fiorentini

Publication Date - February 2020

ISBN: 9780199390915

464 pages
Paperback
7 x 10 inches

In Stock

Retail Price to Students: $79.95

A compelling introduction to the many ways visual culture influences our lives

Description

Ideal for first-year university students from diverse backgrounds, Visual Worlds: Looking, Images, Visual Disciplines provides a full introduction to the visual world across all the fields that theorize it. In contrast with typical visual culture texts, it looks beyond the arts, taking a comparative approach that considers a number of fields including art history and theory but also epistemology, ontology, vision science, neurology, cognitive psychology, law, advertising, medicine, warfare, and more.

Features

  • Presents a broad array of examples--ranging from traditional "artworks" to the physics of candle flames to the visualization of neurons--providing a full introduction to the visual world
  • Covers a wide range of topics in short, thematic chapters, offering instructors great flexibility
  • Emphasizes connections between the arts and sciences, engaging students from a variety of academic backgrounds
  • Focuses on different modes of looking, showing students how seeing can change depending on the object that is seen and on its interpretation by an individual

About the Author(s)

James Elkins is E.C. Chadbourne Chair in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Erna Fiorentini teaches at the Institute for the History of Art and Architecture of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Germany.

Reviews

"The most valuable aspect of Visual Worlds lies in its provocation to think and in particular to rethink, as opposed to the slavish adherence to academic discourse that makes so many textbooks non-relatable to the students they are meant to serve. In that context it is nice to see that the book does not compromise standards to achieve this. I find the book interesting, stimulating, and an important attempt to help shift the discourse on visuality in a useful direction without being overly prescriptive."--André Ruesch, Lesley University

"A wide-ranging look at what visual studies is, and how it can be applied across disciplines, over time, and around the world."--Alima Bucciantini, Duquesne University

"Visual Worlds analyzes visual cultures from a truly multi-dimensional and multidisciplinary perspective."--Alla Myzelev, State University of New York at Geneseo

Table of Contents

    Preface
    Acknowledgments
    Introduction

    PART ONE. CONCEPTS AND THEORIES OF THE VISUAL
    Introduction
    1. Image, Visuality, Visibility
    1.1 Image or Visual Object
    1.2 Visuality and Visibility
    1.3 Darstellung and Vorstellung
    1.4 Xiang
    1.5 The Limitations of Visual Studies Concepts
    2. The Verbal and the Visual
    2.1 Reformulating the Dichotomy
    2.2 Language as an Aid to Seeing
    2.3 Language as an Impediment to Seeing
    3. Vision
    3.1 How the Eye Works
    3.2 Images on the Retina
    3.3 Images in the Brain
    3.4 Science of Vision and Art History
    4. The Gaze
    4.1 The Word "Gaze"
    4.2 Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Theories of the Gaze
    4.3 Psychoanalytic Discourse
    4.4 Gender and Identity Discourse
    4.5 Spatial Discourse
    4.6 Non-European Gazes
    Conclusion
    PART TWO. TYPES OF SEEING
    Introduction
    5. Staring and Peering, Glimpsing and Glancing
    5.1 Staring
    5.2 Peering
    Peering at Paintings, Using the Internet
    Peering at the Insides of Pyramids
    Mutual Peering: The Case of Camouflage
    5.3 Glimpsing and Glancing
    6. Seeing and the Other Senses
    6.1 Sight and Touch
    6.2 Representing Other Senses
    7. Animal Seeing
    7.1 Examples of Animal Seeing
    7.2 How Complex are Animals' Visual Worlds?
    7.3 Deep-Sea Visuality
    Attracting Mates
    Prey Detection
    Prey Luring
    Startling and Confusing Predators
    Countershadowing
    Conclusion
    PART THREE. STYLES OF LOOKING
    Introduction
    8. Looking at The Inside of Your Own Eyes
    8.1 Ways of Looking at the Inside of Your Eyes
    8.2 Afterimages
    8.3 Migraines
    8.4 Other Scotomas
    9. Looking at the Sunset
    9.1 Colors of the Sunset
    9.2 Rays
    9.3 The Speed of the Sunset
    10. Looking at an Oil Painting
    10.1 Phenomenology
    10.2 Materiality
    Painting as Expressive Medium
    Institutional Resistance

    11. Looking at Photographs
    11.1 The End of Indexicality
    11.2 Affect, Memory, and Time
    11.3 Photography's Digital Nature
    12. Looking at Advertisements
    12.1 Parallels with Scientific Imaging
    12.2 Visual Critique of Advertising
    12.3 Advertising Theory
    13. Looking at a Postage Stamp
    13.1 Style History of Postage Stamps
    13.2 Expectations of Close Looking
    13.3 Postage Stamps and Other Small, Overlooked Objects
    Conclusion
    PART FOUR. TURNING WORLDS INTO IMAGES
    Introduction
    14. Visible Worlds
    14.1 Problems of Mimesis
    14.2 Objectivity as a Variant of Mimesis
    15. Invisible Worlds
    15.1 Some Terms
    15.2 From Epistemology to Ethics
    16. Abstract Worlds
    16.1 The Sublime
    16.2 Mental Images
    17. Pictorialization
    17.1 Nonvisual and Nonpictorial
    17.2 Limits of Pictorialization
    17.3 Pictorialization and Truth
    17.4 Pictorialization and Picturing
    18. Visualization
    18.1 Histories of Visualization
    18.2 Kinds of Visualization
    Conclusion
    PART FIVE. HANDLING IMAGES
    Introduction
    19. Administering Images
    19.1 Wunderkammer Projects
    19.2 Encyclopedic Projects
    19.3 Analytic Projects
    20. Worshipping and Destroying Images
    20.1 Elements of the History of Iconoclasm
    20.2 Concepts of Iconoclasm
    20.3 Iconophilia, Iconophobia
    20.4 Onomoclasm, Khay'yal
    21. Using Images to Incite
    21.1 From Images That Represent to Images That Kill
    21.1 How Political Images Move Through the World
    21.3 The Politics of Incitement
    21.4 The Question of When to Watch
    22. Surveillance
    22.1 Surveillance, Sousveillance, and Other Forms
    Pseudo-Panopticons
    Panopticism II: Public Closed-Circuit TV
    Sousveillance: Looking from Below
    Self-Surveillance
    Future Surveillance
    Panopticism III: Mutual Surveillance
    22.2 Neogeography
    Conclusion
    PART SIX. HOW DISCIPLINES LOOK AT IMAGES
    Introduction
    23. How the Military Looks at Images
    23.1 Human Vision and Its Expanded Field
    23.2 Thickets of Representation in Battlefield Visualization
    23.3 Looking Back at the Military
    24. How Doctors Look at Images
    24.1 Images as Constructions and as Truth
    24.2 Neuronavigation and Operational Images
    24.3 Machine-Based Visual Analysis
    24.4 Imaging in Medical Research
    25. How Lawyers Look at Images
    25.1 Case Examples
    25.2 Philosophic Issues
    25.3 The Professionalization of Legal Images
    26. How Scientists Look at Images
    26.1 Scientific Images as Containers for Information
    26.2 Vampire Seeing
    26.3 Scientific Images as Models
    27. How Art Historians Look at Images
    27.1 Senses of Formal Analysis
    27.2 Practices of Formal Analysis
    27.3 The Apparent Neutrality of Formal Analysis
    Conclusion
    PART SEVEN. WRITING IMAGES, WRITING LOOKING
    Introduction
    28. Writing with Images
    28.1 Images as Mnemonics, Examples, and Illustrations
    28.2 Images as Theories
    28.3 Images as Interruptions
    29. Writing about Images
    29.1 The Use of the Term Ekphrasis through History
    29.2 Linear Ekphrasis
    30. Writing through Images
    30.1 Writing About, With, and Through Images: Sebald
    30.2 Images Becoming Literary Texts: Celan
    30.3 Images from Poetry: Dürrenmatt
    30.4 Writing Compelled by Images: Canetti
    30.5 The Dissolution of the Visual in Writing: Proust
    Conclusion
    CONCLUSION
    The Book's Seven Themes
    The Impossible Textbook
    The Variety of Seeing
    The Problem of Particularity
    Thickets of Representation
    Vision Science and Art Theory
    Non-European Terms
    The Omnipresence of Photography
    Envoi
    Glossary
    Picture Credits
    Index


    Picture Credits

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