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Cover

Industrialization and Social Conflict in the Gilded Age

Joel M. Sipress
Series Editors: Joel M. Sipress and David J. Voelker

Publication Date - July 2019

ISBN: 9780190057060

144 pages
Paperback
7-1/2 x 9-1/4 inches

Retail Price to Students: $19.99

Encourage your students to participate in a contested, evidence-based discourse about the human past

Description

Embracing an argument-based model for teaching history, the Debating American History series encourages students to participate in a contested, evidence-based discourse about the human past. Each book poses a question that historians debate--How democratic was the U.S. Constitution? or Why did civil war erupt in the United States in 1861?--and provides abundant primary sources so that students can make their own efforts at interpreting the evidence. They can then use that analysis to construct answers to the big question that frames the debate and argue in support of their position.

Industrialization and Social Conflict in the Gilded Age poses this big question: Why was industrialization in the late nineteenth century accompanied by such great social and political turmoil?

Features

  • Organized around a big question about which historians themselves disagree: Why was industrialization in the late nineteenth century accompanied by such great social and political turmoil?
  • Exposes students to rival positions about which they must make informed judgments
  • Asks students to judge the relative merits of rival positions on the basis of historical evidence
  • Requires students to develop their own positions, for which they must argue on the basis of historical evidence
  • Offers an alternative to the "coverage model" that has dominated History classrooms since the late nineteenth century, and which has consistently fallen short of its own goals since its inception
  • Concise and flexible format allows for inclusion in a variety of classroom settings
  • Each title in the series is edited by Joel M. Sipress and David J. Voelker, award-winning teachers who have published and lectured extensively on reform in the teaching of History
  • The enhanced ebook offers short video clips, flashcards, animated maps, interactive timelines, and additional primary sources

About the Author(s)

Joel M. Sipress received his PhD in US History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Superior, where he teaches US and Latin American History. He serves as coeditor of the Debating American History series with David J. Voelker.

Reviews

"The advantage that Debating American History has over other projects and texts currently available is that it brings a very clear and focused organization to the notion of classroom debate. The terms of each debate are clear. The books introduce students to historiography and primary sources. Most of all, the project re-envisions the way that US history should be taught. No other textbook or set of teaching materials does what these books do when taken together as the sum of their parts."--Ian Hartman, University of Alaska

"Debating American History repositions the discipline of history as one that is rooted in discovery, investigation, and interpretation."--Ingrid Dineen-Wimberly, University of California, Santa Barbara

"Debating American History repositions the discipline of history as one that is rooted in discovery, investigation, and interpretation."--Ingrid Dineen-Wimberly, University of California, Santa Barbara

"I am enormously impressed with the design of this book. It is an exciting setup that moves students and professors rapidly through one of the most contentious periods of modern American societal development. The breakdown is effective and clear and it helps guide students in a meaningful direction. Each layer builds on the previous to help instill knowledge and provoke thought. In this sense, this layout provides a nice structure where different angles are pursued and different voices are in conversation with each other. This is a highly impressive framework."--Michael Holm, Boston University

Table of Contents

    List of Figures
    About the Author
    Acknowledgments
    Introduction
    I. The Big Question
    II. Timeline
    III. Historian's Conversations
    Position #1: A Time of Turmoil: Class War in Industrializing America
    Position #2: The Birth Pangs of the Modern Age: Cultural Change and Social Conflict in Industrializing America
    IV. Debating the Question
    A. Primary Sources on Labor
    Excerpt from International Harvester Brochure (1912)
    Morris Rosenfeld, "In the Factory" (1914)
    Platform of the Knights of Labor (1878)
    Declaration of Principles of the New York Central Labor Union (1880s)
    Samuel Gompers on the Issue of Strikes (1899)
    Andrew Carnegie, "An Employer's View of the Labor Question" (1886)
    United States v. Workingmen's Amalgamated Council of New Orleans, et al. (1893)
    "The Tramps' Terror" (1877)
    B. Primary Sources on Populism
    The Omaha Platform (1892)
    "Sockless Jerry" Simpson, "The Political Rebellion in Kansas" (1891)
    Bettie Gay, "The Influence of Women in the Alliance" (1891)
    Populist Letters to the Colfax Chronicle (1890-1891)
    "What God Freely Gives to Man, Monopoly Appropriates" (1895)
    "The Farmer is the Man" (1927)
    William Allen White, "What's the Matter with Kansas" (1896 and 1946)
    C. Case Studies
    The Homestead Strike of 1892
    The Louisiana Sugar War of 1887
    The New York City Kosher Meat Boycott of 1902
    D. Economic Data
    V. Additional Resources
    Index

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