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Cover

Gender Rules

Identity and Empire in Historical Perspective

Author Karen Phoenix

Publication Date - December 2020

ISBN: 9780197520604

176 pages
Looseleaf

In Stock

Retail Price to Students: $14.99

Each title in the Roots of Contemporary Issues series gives students the opportunity to engage with the contours of a historical argument

Description

Growing directly out of the experiences of a team of historians at Washington State University who designed a new foundational course for WSU's common requirements, the Roots of Contemporary Issues series is built on the premise that students will be better at facing current and future challenges, no matter their major or career path, if they are capable of addressing controversial and pressing issues in mature, reasoned ways using evidence, critical thinking, and clear written and oral communication skills. To help students achieve these goals, each title in the Roots of Contemporary Issues series argues that we need both a historical understanding and an appreciation of the ways in which humans have been interconnected with places around the world for decades and even centuries.

Much of the world's politics revolve around questions about gender and imperialism, including the relationship between gender and empire over the last five hundred years. There are no easy answers to these questions, but the decisions that all of us make about them will have tremendous consequences for individuals and for the planet in the future.

Gender Rules introduces students to history from the point of view of controversial and pressing issues they already know about and many of whom already feel invested in. Each chapter includes both Western and non-Western content, allowing readers to understand the deep past as connected to the present, and to see that the West has interacted with non-Western regions for centuries.

Features

  • Introduces students to history from the point of view of controversial and pressing issues they already know about and many of whom already feel invested in. This increases students' engagement, particularly for general education or required history courses.
  • Every chapter models the analysis of primary sources relevant to the subject. This allows students to imagine the variety of sources available to them for historical research, and to see how historians use different kinds of sources to make conclusions.
  • Every chapter models the engagement with and ways to resolve historiographical debate, helping students to understand that differences of interpretation do not preclude the respectful development of reasonable conclusions.
  • Where appropriate, chapters demonstrate how historians and scholars in other fields rely on one another. Helps non-majors and general education students understand how history can relate to other fields in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
  • Chapters offer depth by offering case studies in world history. Students are able to see the details of a historical argument and narrative instead of relying on surface level descriptions of historical developments.
  • Each chapter models historical knowledge as constructed, not absolute, by describing recent discovery or new conclusions that have changed historians' understanding of the past, or gaps remaining in the historical records. This allows students to understand history not just as the changing events of the past, but as a process of knowledge construction still ongoing today.
  • Connects pre-modern to modern history explicitly. Additionally, each chapter includes both Western and non-Western content. Allows readers to understand the deep past as connected to the present, and to see that the West has interacted with non-Western regions for centuries.

About the Author(s)

Karen Phoenix is Clinical Assistant Professor in the Roots of Contemporary Issues Program at Washington State University.

Table of Contents

    List of Maps/Images
    About the Author
    Acknowledgments
    Series Introduction: Connecting the Past and Present

    INTRODUCTION: Gender and Imperialism

    CHAPTER ONE: Law and Religion in Spanish Latin America
    Religion: The Introduction of Catholicism
    Government: Race, Class, Gender, and the Family
    Work: The Impacts of the Mita/Repartimiento System
    Nonbinary Genders: Two-Spirit Peoples
    Conclusion
    Further Reading

    CHAPTER TWO: Gender and Commerce in the Atlantic World
    European Manufacturing for the Slave Trade
    Impacts of the Atlantic Slave Trade in Africa
    The British Caribbean: Jamaica
    The end of the Slave Trade: England and Abolition
    Conclusion
    Further Reading

    CHAPTER THREE: Gender and Imperial Spaces in French Algeria and Indochina
    The City Itself: Algiers and Hanoi
    Tropical Respite: Dalat Hill Station
    Domestic Spaces: The Harem and the European Home
    Conclusion
    Further Reading

    CHAPTER FOUR: Gender, Attire, and Nationalist Movements in India and Egypt
    The Body Itself
    Covering the Body: Clothing
    The Top of the Body: Headwear
    Conclusion
    Further Reading

    CHAPTER FIVE: Gender, Soft Power, and the Western in Cold War Europe
    The Archetypal Cowboy
    Westerns West and East Germany
    The Role of Women in Westerns
    Conclusion
    Further Reading

    CONCLUSION: A Postgender World?

    Index
    About the Cover

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