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Multiple Choice Quiz

  1. An argument intended to provide logically conclusive support for its conclusion is…
      a. Inductive
      b. Valid
      c. Deductive
      d. Sound
  2. An inductive argument that succeeds in providing probable, but not conclusive, logical support for its conclusion is said to be…
      a. Inductive
      b. Cogent
      c. Weak
      d. Strong
  3. A deductively valid argument cannot have…
      a. True premises and a false conclusion
      b. False premises and a true conclusion
      c. True premises and a true conclusion
      d. False premises and a false conclusion
  4. The first step in investigating possible implicit premises is to…
      a. Search for a credible premise that would make the argument as strong as possible
      b. Rewrite the argument
      c. Search for a credible premise that would make the argument valid
      d. Make a bad argument good
  5. Modus ponens has this argument pattern…
      a. If p, then q. q. Therefore, p.
      b. If p, then q. If q, then r. Therefore, if p, then r.
      c. Either p or q. Not p. Therefore, q.
      d. If p, then q. p. Therefore, q.
  6. The best way to learn how to assess long passages containing an argument is to…
      a. Practice
      b. Look for premises first
      c. Use the five-step method
      d. Look for false premises first
  7. An independent premise offers support to a conclusion…
      a. With the help of another premise
      b. Without the help of any other premises
      c. With implied premises
      d. Without implied premises
  8. The invalid argument form known as affirming the consequent has this pattern:
      a. If p, then q. Not p. Therefore, not q.
      b. Either p or q. Not p. Therefore, q.
      c. If p, then q. p. Therefore, q.
      d. If p, then q. q. Therefore, p.
  9. The invalid argument form known as denying the antecedent has this pattern:
      a. If p, then q. p. Therefore, q.
      b. If p, then q. q. Therefore, p.
      c. If p, then q. Not p. Therefore, not q.
      d. If p, then q. If q, then r. Therefore, if p, then r.
  10. A deductively valid argument with true premises is said to be…
      a. Strong
      b. Weak
      c. Sound
      d. Probable
  11. A valid argument is such that if its premises are true…
      a. Its conclusion must be true
      b. Its conclusion must be false
      c. Its conclusion is neither true nor false
      d. Its structure must be valid
  12. An argument with this structure—If p, then q; If q, then r; therefore if p, then r—is called…
      a. Denying the antecedent
      b. Affirming the consequent
      c. Modus tollens
      d. Hypothetical syllogism
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