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Thought: A Very Short Introduction

Tim Bayne

January 2013

ISBN: 9780199601721

144 pages
Paperback
174x111mm

In Stock

Very Short Introductions

Price: £8.99

In this lively Very Short Introduction, Tim Bayne looks at the nature of thought. Exploring questions such as 'What are thoughts?' and 'How is thought realized in the brain?', he draws on research in philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, and anthropology to look at what we know - and don't know - about the capacity for thought.

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Description

In this lively Very Short Introduction, Tim Bayne looks at the nature of thought. Exploring questions such as 'What are thoughts?' and 'How is thought realized in the brain?', he draws on research in philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, and anthropology to look at what we know - and don't know - about the capacity for thought.

  • A lively and accessible introduction to the nature of thought
  • Establishes the fundamental differences between thought and other mental states
  • Explores and highlights our amazing capacity for thought
  • Looks at the interaction between thought, rationality, and our concept of the abstract
  • Part of the bestselling Very Short Introductions series

About the Author(s)

Tim Bayne, Professor of Philosophy, The University of Manchester

Tim Bayne is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Manchester. He has taught at the University of Canterbury, Macquarie University, and the University of Oxford. His main interests are in the philosophy of psychology, with a particular focus on consciousness. A native of New Zealand, he divides his time between Manchester and Geneva.

Table of Contents

    1: What is thought?
    2: The mechanical mind
    3: The inner sanctum
    4: Of brutes and babes
    5: 'They don't think like we do'
    6: Thought gone wrong
    7: The ethics of thought
    8: The limits of thought