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Cover

The Texture of the Lexicon

Relational Morphology and the Parallel Architecture

Ray Jackendoff and Jenny Audring

October 2021

ISBN: 9780198827917

384 pages
Paperback
246x171mm

Price: £19.99

This volume offers a major reconceptualization of linguistic theory through the lens of morphology, crucially collapsing the distinction between the lexicon and the grammar. This approach accounts for both productive and non-productive morphological phenomena, and moreover integrates linguistic theory into psycholinguistics and human cognition.

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Description

This volume offers a major reconceptualization of linguistic theory through the lens of morphology, crucially collapsing the distinction between the lexicon and the grammar. This approach accounts for both productive and non-productive morphological phenomena, and moreover integrates linguistic theory into psycholinguistics and human cognition.

  • Clearly and accessibly presented, and illustrated with a wide range of data
  • Situates the language faculty naturally in an overall view of the mind
  • Formally explicit and psychologically plausible
  • Builds on Jackendoff's well-established Parallel Architecture, with a focus on morphology and phonology

About the Author(s)

Ray Jackendoff, Professor Emeritus, Tufts University, and Jenny Audring, Assistant Professor of Linguistics, Leiden University

<b>Ray Jackendoff</b> is Seth Merrin Professor Emeritus and former co-director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University; he is currently a Research Affiliate in Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. He has written widely on syntax, semantics, the architecture of grammar, the evolution of language, music cognition, and consciousness. He was the recipient of the 2003 Jean Nicod Prize and the 2014 David Rumelhart Prize, and has served as President of both the Linguistic Society of America and the Society for Philosophy and Psychology. He is the author of the OUP volumes Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution (2002), Simpler Syntax (with Peter Culicover, 2005), Meaning and the Lexicon: The Parallel Architecture 1975-2010 (2010), and A User's Guide to Thought and Meaning (2012).

<b>Jenny Audring</b> is Assistant Professor of Linguistics at Leiden University. She specializes in morphology and has written extensively on grammatical gender. Her research interests range from linguistic complexity and Canonical Typology to Construction Morphology and morphological theory. She is the co-editor, with Francesca Masini, of The Oxford Handbook of Morphological Theory (OUP, 2018) and, with Sebastian Fedden and Greville G. Corbett, of Non-Canonical Gender Systems (OUP, 2018).

Table of Contents

    Part I: The Theory
    1:Situating morphology
    2:The functions of schemas
    3:Motivation in the lexicon
    Part II: Using and refining the tools
    4:Formalizing morphological phenomena
    5:Formalizing inflection
    6:Morphologically conditioned phonological alternations
    Part III: Beyond morphological theory
    7:Language processing and language acquisition through the lens of Relational Morphology
    8:Applying the tools to other domains
    9:Coda: What have we done?
    References
    Index of words and schemas
    Index of authors and subjects

Reviews

"Review from previous edition This is the best linguistics book of 2020: A comprehensive view of morphological patterns that does not struggle with, but comfortably explains, the frequently observed continuity between regular grammatical patterns and memorized/idiosyncratic forms." - Martin Haspelmath

"Through extending Jackendoff's Parallel Architecture by a sophisticated system of co-indexing, the authors develop a surprising perspective on language as a whole. They overcome the separation of grammar and lexicon, the contrast of regular and idiosyncratic items, of productive and unproductive patterns, of core and periphery. Relational Morphology brings with it a new and exciting picture of language as an integrated mental capacity." - Manfred Bierwisch, Humboldt University of Berlin

"Jackendoff and Audring unravel the illusory divide between the lexicon and grammar to weave together, with enduring insights, a vast range of semi-regular and fully engaging phenomena." - Adele Goldberg, Princeton University

"Jackendoff and Audring combine the models of Parallel Architecture and Construction Morphology to propose an innovative perspective on the lexicon, morphology, phonology, syntax, semantics, and their interaction, centered around their simple, but far-reaching, Relational Hypothesis: all types of linguistic relatedness can be coded as static relational schemas over fully listed items, but a subset of those schemas also serve as productive, generative devices. The authors' wide-ranging exploration lays down the gauntlet for competing models." - Andrew Spencer, University of Essex

"This is a lovely book that elaborates the elegant and simple functional linguistic perspective of Jackendoff's (2002) "Parallel Architecture" research program into a detailed attempt to explain what lexical items are. The answer that Jackendoff and Audring arrive at is surprising: there is no principled distinction between grammar and lexicon, contrary to what has standardly been assumed. There is a wealth of fascinating predictions to test here." - Ted Gibson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology