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Cover

Sayings and Anecdotes

with Other Popular Moralists

Diogenes the Cynic
Translated by Robin Hard

May 2012

ISBN: 9780199589241

320 pages
Paperback
196x129mm

In Stock

Oxford World's Classics

Price: £9.99

A unique edition of the sayings of Diogenes, whose biting wit and eccentricity inspired the anecdotes that express his Cynic philosophy. It includes the accounts of his immediate successors, such as Crates and Hipparchia, and the witty moral preacher Bion. The contrasting teachings of the Cyrenaics and the hedonistic Aristippos complete the volume.

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Description

A unique edition of the sayings of Diogenes, whose biting wit and eccentricity inspired the anecdotes that express his Cynic philosophy. It includes the accounts of his immediate successors, such as Crates and Hipparchia, and the witty moral preacher Bion. The contrasting teachings of the Cyrenaics and the hedonistic Aristippos complete the volume.

  • The only selection of the sayings and anecdotes of Diogenes, the ancient Greek philosopher whose biting wit and bizarre behaviour has passed down to the present day in European literature and art.
  • Offers a comprehensive survey of Diogenes' moral philosophy in the form of pithy maxims and entertaining stories, together with his immediate followers, including Crates, and other early philosophers in the Cynic, Stoic, and Cyrenaic schools, and a lively selection from the apocryphal correspondence of the Cynics and Socratics.
  • The first source-book in English for Diogenes and the early Cynics, bringing together material from a variety of different original sources.
  • Attractive, colloquial translation emphasizes the accessible nature of the material.
  • Introduction explains the significance of the anecdotal material in relation to the moral teaching of each school, and looks at the stories that have come down to us about Diogenes' famously ascetic life, such as living in a storage-jar. Explanatory Notes identify people and places, and explain literary and cultural allusions.
  • Includes indexes of names and themes.

About the Author(s)

Diogenes the Cynic

Translated by Robin Hard

Robin Hard has translated Apollodorus' Library of Greek Mythology and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations for Oxford World's Classics. He is the author of the Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology.

Table of Contents

    Diogenes and the Early Cynics
    A Humorous Portrait of Diogenes and Aristippos
    Diogenes' Conversion to the Ascetic Life
    The Sage as Beggar
    Self-Characterization
    A Short-cut to Philosophy
    The World of Illusion
    Religion and Superstition
    Politicians and Rulers
    The Sale and Enslavement of Diogenes
    Moralistic and Traditional
    Diogenes as Wit
    Old Age and Death
    Immediate Followers of Diogenes
    Sayings and Anecdotes of Crates
    The Followers of Crates
    Postscript: Borysthenes of Bion
    Antisthenes as Forerunner of Cynicism
    Aristippos and the Cyrenaics
    Aristippos of Cyrene
    The Cyrenaic School under the Younger Aristippos
    The Other Cyrenaics
    Apocryphal Letters
    Selections from the Cynic Letters
    Correspondence of Aristippos

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