We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Cover

Satires and Epistles

Horace
Translated by John Davie and with introduction and notes by Robert Cowan

April 2011

ISBN: 9780199563289

240 pages
Paperback
196x129mm

In Stock

Oxford World's Classics

Price: £9.99

Horace exposes the vices and follies of his Roman contemporaries in his Satires, and the Epistles include the famous Art of Poetry, whose advice on poetic style influenced many later writers and dramatists. John Davie's new prose translations perfectly capture the ribald style of the original.

Share:

Description

Horace exposes the vices and follies of his Roman contemporaries in his Satires, and the Epistles include the famous Art of Poetry, whose advice on poetic style influenced many later writers and dramatists. John Davie's new prose translations perfectly capture the ribald style of the original.

  • A new translation of Horace's satires and epistles that does full justice to the caustic, ribald style of the satires, together with an up-to-date critical introduction and notes.
  • John Davie's prose translation perfectly captures the lively, scurrilous, and frequently hilarious style of the satires, and the warm and engaging persona of the more meditative epistles.
  • Includes the important Ars poetica, the 'art of poetry', Horace's treatise on poetics in the form of advice to an aspiring writer, particularly of epic and drama.
  • Robert Cowan's introduction and notes take account of the latest scholarship, and contextualize Horace's poems within the development of Roman satire and the themes of philosophy, morality, sex and gender, literary criticism, politics and patronage.
  • Horace's works were hugely influential from the Renaissance to the present, on writers from Ben Jonson and Alexander Pope to W.H. Auden and Robert Frost.

About the Author(s)

Horace

Translated by John Davie, former Head of Classics, St Paul's School, London, and with introduction and notes by Robert Cowan, Fairfax Tutorial Fellow in Latin Literature, Balliol College, Oxford