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Cover

Principles of International Criminal Law

Third Edition

Gerhard Werle and Florian Jeßberger

August 2014

ISBN: 9780198703600

720 pages
Paperback
246x171mm

In Stock

Price: £54.00

Principles of International Criminal Law is one of the leading textbooks in the field. This third edition builds on the highly-successful work of the previous editions, setting out the general principles governing international crimes as well as the fundamentals of both substantive and procedural international criminal law.

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Description

Principles of International Criminal Law is one of the leading textbooks in the field. This third edition builds on the highly-successful work of the previous editions, setting out the general principles governing international crimes as well as the fundamentals of both substantive and procedural international criminal law.

  • The third edition of one of the best-regarded works on international criminal law, by two of the world's experts in the field
  • Provides a comprehensive understanding of the foundations of international criminal law and the core crimes it governs
  • Offers an accessible overview for both students, legal practitioners, and judges working on cases concerning crimes, both at the international and domestic levels
  • Builds on the previous editions' philosophical and normative analysis of international criminal justice, and discusses new developments in the field, including recent case law from the International Criminal Court
  • Assesses the compromise concerning the crime of aggression in the ICC statute in the Kampala case

About the Author(s)

Gerhard Werle, Professor of International Criminal Law, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Florian Jeßberger, Professor of Criminal Law, University of Hamburg

Gerhard Werle is Professor of International Criminal Law at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. He has been a visiting professor at various universities worldwide, including Columbia Law School, New York; Kansai University, Osaka University of Sydney; University of Technology, Sydney; University of Cape Town; and University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, where he is Director of the South African-German Centre for Development Research and Criminal Justice. Professor Werle was a member of the Working Group on the Introduction of a Code of Crimes Against International Law established by the German Federal Ministry of Justice, and is a member of the Expert Committee of the German Red Cross on International Humanitarian Law. His works on international criminal law, transitional justice, and modern legal history have been published widely in many languages.

Florian Jessberger is Professor of Criminal Law at the University of Hamburg, where he serves as the Director of the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies, and a Vice Dean of the Faculty of Law. Jessberger holds law degrees from the University of Cologne and the Humboldt-University Berlin. Before joining Hamburg University's Faculty of Law in 2010, Jessberger was the Lichtenberg Professor of International and Comparative Criminal Law at Humboldt-University in Berlin.

Table of Contents

    Part One: Foundations
    1: Historical Evolution of International Criminal Law
    2: Concepts, Tasks, and Legitimacy
    3: International Criminal Law and the International Legal Order
    4: Sources and Interpretation
    5: Universal Jurisdiction, the Duty to Prosecute, Transitional Justice
    6: Enforcement
    7: Domestic Implementation
    Part Two: General Principles
    8: Towards a General Theory of Crimes Under International Law
    9: Material Elements
    10: Mental Element
    11: Individual Criminal Responsibility
    12: Superior Responsibility
    13: Grounds for Excluding Criminal Responsibility
    14: Inchoate Crimes
    15: Omissions
    16: Official Capacity and Immunity
    17: Multiplicity of Offenses
    18: Requirements for Prosecution
    Part Three: Genocide
    19: Introduction
    20: Material Elements
    21: Mental Element
    22: Incitement to Commit Genocide
    23: Multiplicity of Offenses
    Part Four: Crimes Against Humanity
    24: Introduction
    25: Contextual Element (Attack on a Civilian Population)
    26: Individual Acts
    27: Multiplicity of Offenses
    Part Five: War Crimes
    28: Introduction
    29: Overall Requirements
    30: War Crimes Against Persons
    31: War Crimes Against Property and Other Rights
    32: Employing Prohibited Methods of Warfare
    33: Use of Prohibited Means of Warfare
    34: War Crimes Against Humanitarian Operations
    35: Multiplicity of Offenses
    Part Six: The Crime of Aggression
    36: The Prohibition of Aggression Under International Law
    37: Criminal Responsibility Under Customary International Law (War of Aggression)
    38: The Crime of Aggression in the ICC Statute Prospects

Reviews

"`Review from previous edition '... the book's structure and style allow for its use both as a reference work and as a practitioner's manual ... the author's scholarly modesty in naming his treatise Principles of International Criminal Law deserves a particular mention. Professors Ian Browlie and Eric David had both previously adopted similar titles for their classical monographs on the law of peace and the law of armed conflict. If the experience of those modestly-named volumes is a any guide, Principles of International Criminal Law may also have a very successful future ahead.'' Journal of International Criminal Justice"

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