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Cover

Personifying Prehistory

Relational Ontologies in Bronze Age Britain and Ireland

Joanna Brück

September 2021

ISBN: 9780192858252

320 pages
Paperback
216x138mm

In Stock

Price: £19.99

This book draws on the wealth of new evidence for Bronze Age burials, settlements, and landscapes to explore the construction of social relationships and community identities during this period.

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Description

This book draws on the wealth of new evidence for Bronze Age burials, settlements, and landscapes to explore the construction of social relationships and community identities during this period.

  • Draws on new and unpublished finds from the many developer-funded excavations carried out over the past 20 years
  • The first book on Bronze Age Britain and Ireland to apply contemporary archaeological theory to this rich dataset
  • Employs a wealth of images, many of which have previously appeared only in local/specialist publications

About the Author(s)

Joanna Brück, Professor of Archaeology and Head of the School of Archaeology, University College Dublin

Joanna Brück is Professor of Archaeology and Head of the School of Archaeology at University College Dublin. Her primary area of research is the archaeology of Bronze Age Britain and Ireland. She is particularly interested in the treatment of the human body and concepts of the self; depositional practices and what these reveal about the meanings and values ascribed to objects; and the relationship between space and society including domestic architecture and the changing organisation of landscape. She co-organises the Bronze Age Forum, is Vice President of the Prehistoric Society, and is an editor of Archaeological Dialogues. She has also recently published an edited volume on the material and visual culture of the 1916 Rising in Ireland.

Table of Contents

    1:Introduction: Identity and Alterity in Bronze Age Britain and Ireland
    2:Fragmenting the Body
    3:Object Biographies
    4:The Living House
    5:Social Landscapes
    6:Conclusion: The Flow of Life in Bronze Age Britain and Ireland

Reviews

"Personifying Prehistory is a tour de force that encapsulates the theoretical work that Joanna Brück has developed over the last two decades and combines it with in-depth and detailed case studies from the most important aspects of making persons in the British and Irish Bronze Age... Brück weaves a captivating spell, she invites the reader to cast an enquiring eye at the British and Irish Bronze Age, an Age that in her retelling is rich with interwoven meaning, where breaking and forging things, materials, bodies, landscapes, becomes different tunes making up one mighty song." - Kristin Armstrong Oma, Museum of Archaeology, University of Stavanger, Norway, Norwegian Archaeological Review

"Personifying Prehistory: Relational Ontologies in Bronze Age Britain and Ireland is the culmination of two decades of work by a true leader in the field. The book is richly illustrated throughout with line drawings, mostly by Anne Leaver. This is the first book-length treatment of the British and Irish Bronze Age and is sure to become a standard text for scholars." - Rachel J. Crellin, University of Leicester, Cambridge Archaeological Journal

"The book is beautifully written, highly detailed, thought-provoking and extremely up to date...This is a richly textured book that I expect will stand the test of time; it is important reading for those interested in Bronze Age North-west Europe and for anyone seeking an excellent example of how to draw inferences about personhood and ontology from archaeological evidence." - Chris Fowler, Newcastle University, Antiquity

"If you want a book that emphasises the complex relations out of which the past emerges, that asks us to take the daily lives of ordinary people seriously, and which recognises that the simple oppositions we draw between people, things, animals, and places weremore complex in the past than we sometimes assume, then I cannot recommend this highly enough." - Oliver Harris, European Journal of Archaeology