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Objectivity: A Very Short Introduction

Stephen Gaukroger

May 2012

ISBN: 9780199606696

128 pages
Paperback
174x111mm

Very Short Introductions

Price: £8.99

Objectivity is both an essential and elusive philosophical concept. This Very Short Introduction explores the theoretical and practical problems raised by objectivity, and also deals with the way in which particular understandings of objectivity impinge on social research, science, and art.

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Description

Objectivity is both an essential and elusive philosophical concept. This Very Short Introduction explores the theoretical and practical problems raised by objectivity, and also deals with the way in which particular understandings of objectivity impinge on social research, science, and art.

  • Explains a complex philosophical topic and considers all of the key questions involved
  • Considers whether true objectivity is achievable and asks whether we are morally obliged to be objective
  • Explores the theoretical and practical problems associated with objective thought
  • Looks at the way objectivity relates to science, social research, and art
  • Part of the bestselling Very Short Introductions series - over five million copies sold worldwide

About the Author(s)

Stephen Gaukroger, ARC Professorial Fellow, University of Sydney, Australia and Professor of Philosophy, University of Aberdeen

Stephen Gaukroger has been Professor of History of Philosophy and History of Science in the Philosophy Department at the University of Sydney since 1981. His publications include, The Emergence of a Scientific Culture: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1210-1685 (OUP, 2006) and Descartes' System of Natural Philosophy (CUP, 2002).

Table of Contents

    1:Introduction
    2:Aren't all judgements biased in one way or another?
    3:Don't all judgements involve some assumptions?
    4:Doesn't science show there is no objectivity?
    5:Is it possible to represent things objectively?
    6:Is objectivity a form of honesty?
    7:Objectivity in numbers?
    8:Can the study of human behaviour be objective?
    9:Can there be objectivity in ethics?
    10:Can there be objectivity in taste?
    References
    Further reading