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Cover

Nominalization

50 Years on from Chomsky's Remarks

Edited by Artemis Alexiadou and Hagit Borer

November 2020

ISBN: 9780198865582

480 pages
Paperback
234x153mm

Oxford Studies in Theoretical Linguistics

Price: £35.00

This volume explores the progress of cross-linguistic research into the structure of complex nominals since the publication of Chomsky's 'Remarks on Nominalization' in 1970. The contributors take stock of developments in this area and offer new perspectives based on data from a wide range of typologically diverse languages.

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Description

This volume explores the progress of cross-linguistic research into the structure of complex nominals since the publication of Chomsky's 'Remarks on Nominalization' in 1970. The contributors take stock of developments in this area and offer new perspectives based on data from a wide range of typologically diverse languages.

  • Provides new perspectives on the structure of complex nominals
  • Offers wide cross-linguistic coverage, including data from several understudied languages
  • Includes a short contribution from Noam Chomsky

About the Author(s)

Edited by Artemis Alexiadou, Professor of English Linguistics, Humboldt University Berlin, and Hagit Borer, Professor of Linguistics, Queen Mary University of London

Artemis Alexiadou is Professor of English Linguistics at Humboldt University of Berlin and Vice Director of the Leibniz-Centre General Linguistics (ZAS) in Berlin. Her work on the syntax and morphology of noun phrases and argument alternations has been published in multiple international journals, and she is the co-editor of the OUP volumes The Syntax of Roots and the Roots of Syntax (with Hagit Borer and Florian Schäfer; 2014) and External Arguments in Transitivity Alternations (with Elena Anagnostopoulou and Florian Schäfer; 2015). In 2014 she was awarded the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize by the German Research Foundation for excellence in research.

Hagit Borer is a Professor of Linguistics at Queen Mary University of London. Her research involves the division of labour between the lexicon and syntax, and touches on morphosyntax as well as the syntax-semantics interface. She is the author of the three-volume work Structuring Sense: Volume 1, In Name Only (OUP 2005) focuses on nominal structure; Volume 2, The Normal Course of Events (OUP 2005) explores event structure; and Volume 3, Taking Form (OUP 2013) looks at morphosyntax and word formation. She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2017.

Table of Contents

    1:Introduction, Artemis Alexiadou and Hagit Borer
    2:Remarks on Nominalization: Background and motivation, Noam Chomsky
    3:Unifying nominal and verbal syntax: Agreement and feature realization, Peter Ackema and Ad Neeleman
    4:Bases, transformations, and competition in Hebrew niXYaZ, Odelia Ahdout and Itamar Kastner
    5:D vs n nominalizations within and across languages, Artemis Alexiadou
    6:Nominalizing verbal passive: PROs and cons, Hagit Borer
    7:Nominalization and selection in two Mayan languages, Jessica Coon and Justin Royer
    8:Three ways of unifying participles and nominalizations: The case of Udmurt, Éva Dékány and Ekaterina Georgieva
    9:Relative nominals and event nominals in Hiaki, Heidi Harley
    10:Categorization and nominalization in zero nominals, Gianina Iordăchioaia
    11:Remarks on propositional nominalization, Keir Moulton
    12:Where are thematic roles? Building the micro-syntax of implicit arguments in nominalization, Tom Roeper
    13: Agent and other function nominals in a neo-constructionist approach to nominalizations, Isabelle Roy and Elena Soare
    14:Polish psych nominals revisited, Bożena Rozwadowska
    15:Nominalizations, case domains, and restructuring in two Amazonian languages, Andrés Pablo Salanova and Adam J.R. Tallman
    16:Prepositional prefixing and allosemy in nominalizations, Jim Wood