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Molecular Biology

Principles of Genome Function

Third Edition

Nancy Craig, Rachel Green, Carol Greider, Gisela Storz, and Cynthia Wolberger

February 2021

ISBN: 9780198788652

912 pages
Paperback
276x219mm

Price: £54.99

A fresh, distinctive approach to the teaching of molecular biology. With its focus on key principles, its emphasis on the commonalities that exist between the three kingdoms of life, and its integrated coverage of experimental methods and approaches, Molecular Biology is the perfect companion to any molecular biology course.

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Description

A fresh, distinctive approach to the teaching of molecular biology. With its focus on key principles, its emphasis on the commonalities that exist between the three kingdoms of life, and its integrated coverage of experimental methods and approaches, Molecular Biology is the perfect companion to any molecular biology course.

  • A focus on the underlying principles equips students with a robust conceptual framework on which to add further detail from the vast amount of scientific information available to us today
  • An emphasis on commonalities reflects the conserved molecular processes and components that we now know to exist between bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes
  • Experimental Approach panels demonstrate the central importance of experimental evidence to furthering our understanding of molecular biology by describing research that has been particularly valuable in elucidating different aspects of the subject
  • Online resources, for both instructors and students alike, enhance the educational value of the text
  • Also available as an e-book with functionality, navigation features, and links that offer extra learning support

New to this edition

  • New content on epigenetics, targeted genome editing and pre-mRNA splicing
  • Cutting-edge scientific breakthroughs in CRISPR technology, including a description of newly defined steps in the molecular mechanisms underlying CRISPR-mediated adaptation in bacterial adaptive immunity; and a description of a recently discovered transposable element family whose integration mechanism is closely related to and involves molecular relatives of the CRISPR-Cas bacterial adaptive immunity system
  • Enhanced coverage of DNA replication and regulatory RNAs
  • Seven new Experimental Approach panels

About the Author(s)

Nancy Craig, Professor, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Rachel Green, Professor, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Carol Greider, Professor, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Gisela Storz, Bethesda, MD, and Cynthia Wolberger, Professor, Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Nancy L Craig received an A.B. in Biology and Chemistry from Bryn Mawr College in 1973 and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1980 at Cornell University, where she worked on DNA repair with Jeff Roberts. She then worked on phage lambda recombination as a postdoctoral fellow with Howard Nash at the National Institutes of Health. She joined the faculty of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of California, San Francisco in 1984 and began her work on transposable elements. She joined the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1991, where she is currently a Professor and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, as well as the recipient of the Johns Hopkins University Alumni Association Excellence in Teaching Award. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Rachel Green received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1986 and a Ph.D. in Biological Chemistry from Harvard University in 1992, where she worked with Jack Szostak studying catalytic RNA. She then did postdoctoral work in the laboratory of Harry Noller at the University of California, Santa Cruz, studying the role played by the ribosomal RNAs in the function of the ribosome. She is currently a Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Her work continues to focus on the mechanism and regulation of translation in bacteria and eukaryotes. She is the recipient of a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Graduate Teaching Award.

Carol Greider received a B.A. from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1983. In 1987, she received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, where she worked with Elizabeth Blackburn, and co-discovered telomerase. In 1988, she went to Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and was promoted to Senior Staff Scientist. In 1997 she moved to The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where she is currently the Daniel Nathans Professor and Director of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, and a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor. Her work focuses on the mechanisms of telomere length regulation and short telomere syndromes, as well as telomeres in cancer. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is the recipient of numerous awards. In 2009, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine together with Elizabeth Blackburn and Jack Szostak for the discovery of telomerase.

Gisela Storz graduated from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1984 with a B.A. in Biochemistry and received a Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1988 from the University of California at Berkeley, where she worked for Bruce Ames. After postdoctoral fellowships with Sankar Adhya at the National Cancer Institute and Fred Ausubel at Harvard Medical School, she moved to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, where she is now an NIH Distinguished Investigator. Her research is focused on understanding gene regulation in response to environmental stress as well as elucidating the functions of regulatory RNAs and very small proteins. She is a member of the American Academy of Microbiology, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and National Academy of Sciences, and received the American Society for Microbiology Eli Lilly Award.

Cynthia Wolberger received her A.B. in Physics from Cornell University in 1979 and a Ph.D. in Biophysics from Harvard University in 1987, where she worked with Stephen Harrison and Mark Ptashne on the structure of the phage 434 cro repressor bound to DNA. She went on to study the structures of eukaryotic protein-DNA complexes as a postdoctoral fellow, first in the laboratory of Robert Stroud and the University of California, San Francisco and then in the laboratory of Carl Pabo at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where she is now Professor of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her research focuses on the structural and biochemical mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation and ubiquitin-mediated signalling. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Table of Contents

    1:Genomes and the flow of biological information
    2:Biological molecules
    3:The chemical basis of life
    4:Chromosome structure and function
    5:The cell cycle
    6:DNA replication
    7:Chromosome segregation
    8:Transcription
    9:Regulation of transcription
    10:RNA processing
    11:Translation
    12:Regulation of translation
    13:Regulatory RNAs
    14:Protein modification and targeting
    15:Cellular responses to DNA damage
    16:Repair of DNA double-strand breaks and homologous recombination
    17:Mobile DNA
    18:Genomics and genetic variation
    19:Tools and techniques in molecular biology

Reviews

"This is a comprehensive molecular biology textbook that emphasizes biochemical principles and molecular interactions... I believe that overall, it's the best text available for my students." - Donna E Crone, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

"Conveys in-depth material in an easily digestible manner. Makes clear connections between different topics to improve understanding of key concepts." - Scott Bailey, Johns Hopkins University

"This book would be excellent for a 300- or 400- level course and provides a nice entrée into using primary literature and experimental results in the lecture." - Harold Olivey, Indiana University Northwest

Additional Resources

Digital formats and resources

Molecular Biology: Principles of Genome Function is supported by online resources and is available for students and institutions to purchase in a variety of formats.

The e-book offers a mobile experience and convenient access along with functionality tools, navigation features and links that offer extra learning support: www.oxfordtextbooks.co.uk/ebooks

The book's online resources for both instructors and students alike, enhance the educational value of the text.

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