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Cover

Modeling the Meanings of Pictures

Depiction and the philosophy of language

John Kulvicki

September 2020

ISBN: 9780198847472

176 pages
Hardback
216x138mm

In Stock

Price: £55.00

John Kulvicki explores the many ways in which pictures can be meaningful, taking inspiration from the philosophy of language. Pictures are important parts of communicative acts. They express a variety of thoughts, and they are also representations. Kulvicki shows how the meanings of pictures let us put them to a wide range of communicative uses.

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Description

John Kulvicki explores the many ways in which pictures can be meaningful, taking inspiration from the philosophy of language. Pictures are important parts of communicative acts. They express a variety of thoughts, and they are also representations. Kulvicki shows how the meanings of pictures let us put them to a wide range of communicative uses.

  • An original account of the ways in which pictures are meaningful
  • Includes chapters on pictorial metaphor, iconography and cartography, which are rarely discussed in philosophy
  • No other book discusses pictures in relation to the philosophy of language
  • Specialises in a number of philosophical fields, such as the philosophy of art, language, mind, perception and representation

About the Author(s)

John Kulvicki, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Dartmouth University, USA

John Kulvicki received his PhD from the University of Chicago and worked at Washington University in St Louis and Carleton University before coming to Dartmouth. He writes on the philosophy of perception and philosophy of art.

Table of Contents

    Preface
    1:Pictures, communication, and meaning
    2:Character, content, and reference
    3:Parts of pictures
    4:Pictorial dthat
    5:Iconography
    6:Metaphor
    7:Direct reference in pictures and maps
    8:Distinguishing kinds by parts