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Cover

Law for Computer Scientists and Other Folk

Mireille Hildebrandt

May 2020

ISBN: 9780198860884

352 pages
Paperback
234x156mm

In Stock

Price: £31.49

This is a textbook on law for computer scientists and many others with no wish to become a lawyer, who are nevertheless in need of a proper introduction to how law operates and how it affects individuals, societies, and others. It introduces: privacy and data protection, cybercrime, copyright, private law liability and legal personhood.

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Description

This is a textbook on law for computer scientists and many others with no wish to become a lawyer, who are nevertheless in need of a proper introduction to how law operates and how it affects individuals, societies, and others. It introduces: privacy and data protection, cybercrime, copyright, private law liability and legal personhood.

  • The only dedicated textbook introducing law to computer scientists and other relevant audiences (non lawyers)
  • Dedicated focus on cybercrime, intellectual property, data protection, private law liability and legal personhood
  • The book will provide insight into the operations of the law, demonstrating the specifics of legal reasoning
  • Clear structure with a reader's guide, a handy glossary/index, and frequent cross-referencing throughout the book
  • This is an open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence

About the Author(s)

Mireille Hildebrandt, Research Professor 'Interfacing Law and Technology', Free University Brussels

Table of Contents

    Acknowledgements
    Reading Guide
    Abbreviations
    Table of Contents
    1:Introduction: Textbook and Essay
    1.1:Middle ground: architecture
    1.2:Law in 'speakerspace'
    1.3:Law in 'manuscriptspace'
    1.4:Law in 'bookspace'
    1.5:Law in cyberspace: a new 'onlife world'
    1.6:Outline
    PART I WHAT LAW DOES
    2.:Law, Democracy, and the Rule of Law
    2.1:What is Law?
    2.2:What is law in a constitutional democracy?
    3.:Domains of Law: Private, Public, and Criminal Law
    3.1:Private, public and criminal law: conceptual distinctions
    3.2:Private law
    3.3:Public law and criminal law
    4.:International and Supranational Law
    4.1:Jurisdiction in Western legal systems
    4.2:International law
    4.3:Supranational law
    4.4:International rule of law
    PART II DOMAINS OF CYBERLAW
    5.:Privacy and Data Protection
    5.1:Human rights law
    5.2:The concept of privacy
    5.3:The right to privacy
    5.4:Privacy and Data Protection
    5.5:Data protection law
    5.6:Privacy and data protection revisited
    6.:Cybercrime
    6.1:The problem of cybercrime
    6.2:Cybercrime and public law
    6.3:The EU cybercrime and cybersecurity directives
    7.:Copyright in Cyberspace
    7.1:IP law as private law
    7.2:Overview of IP rights
    7.3:History, objectives and scope of copyright protection
    7.4:EU copyright law
    7.5:Open source and free access
    8.:Private Law Liability for Faulty ICT
    8.1:Back to basics
    8.2:Tort law in Europe
    8.3:Third-party liability for unlawful processing and other cyber torts
    PART III FRONTIERS OF LAW IN AN ONLIFE WORLD
    9.:Legal Personhood for AI?
    9.1:Legal subjectivity
    9.2:Legal agency
    9.3:Artificial agents
    9.4:Private law liability
    10.:'Legal by Design' or 'Legal Protection by Design'?
    10.1:Machine learning (ML)
    10.2:Distributed Ledger Technologies (DLTs), smart contracts and smart regulation
    10.3:'Legal by Design' or 'Legal Protection by Design'?
    FINALS
    11.:Closure: on ethics, code and law
    11.1:Distinctions between law, code and ethics
    11.2:The conceptual relationship between law, code and ethics
    11.3:The interaction between law, code and ethics
    11.4:Closure: the force of technology and the force of law