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Cover

Indian Cinema: A Very Short Introduction

Ashish Rajadhyaksha

July 2016

ISBN: 9780198723097

160 pages
Paperback
174x111mm

In Stock

Very Short Introductions

Price: £7.99

The Indian cinema sells 2.9 billion movie tickets annually, the largest in the world. Yet, as an economic entity, the Indian movie industry remains small, with an annual revenue that is 5% of Hollywood's. This volume throws light on the history of Indian cinema and the circumstances that saw the birth of one of the world's great countercultures.

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Description

The Indian cinema sells 2.9 billion movie tickets annually, the largest in the world. Yet, as an economic entity, the Indian movie industry remains small, with an annual revenue that is 5% of Hollywood's. This volume throws light on the history of Indian cinema and the circumstances that saw the birth of one of the world's great countercultures.

  • Locates the Indian film industry within a larger Cinema Studies framework
  • Frames the history of Indian cinema within its economic and cultural context, from the influence of colonialism to the different moments of independent India
  • Focuses on Bollywood as a key player in the creative economy
  • Part of the bestselling Very Short Introductions series - over seven million copies sold worldwide

About the Author(s)

Ashish Rajadhyaksha, Independent researcher

Ashish Rajadhyaksha is a film historian and film curator. He is the co-author of the Encyclopaedia of Indian Cinema (with Paul Willemen, London: British Film Institute, 1994/1999), and author of several books on the Indian cinema. He has curated major exhibitions and film festivals, You Don't Belong, Film season of 35 Indian films in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Kunming and Hong Kong (2011), the exhibition 'Memories of Cinema' at the IVth Guangzhou Triennial (2011) and co-curated (with Geeta Kapur) the exhibition 'Bombay/ Mumbai 1992-2001', a part of the exhibition Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis, Tate Modern (2002). He has held fellowships and been visiting faculty at the University of Chicago, the Lingnan University, Hong Kong, the Korean National University of Arts and the National University of Singapore.

Table of Contents

    Preface
    1:The political popular
    2:Imperatives of cinematic realism: Late colonial India
    3:The 'all-India' film, partition, and new careers for the cinema
    4:The new cinemas
    5:Bollywood
    References
    Further reading
    Index