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Cover

Human-Wildlife Conflict

Complexity in the Marine Environment

Edited by Megan Draheim, Francine Madden, Julie-Beth McCarthy, and Chris Parsons

July 2015

ISBN: 9780199687152

224 pages
Paperback
240x168mm

In Stock

Price: £42.99

This is the first human-wildlife conflict (HWC) book to focus on the marine system, exploring the complexity of HWC in marine-based conservation through the 'Level of Conflict' model, a theoretical yet highly practical tool developed in the peace-building field.

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Description

This is the first human-wildlife conflict (HWC) book to focus on the marine system, exploring the complexity of HWC in marine-based conservation through the 'Level of Conflict' model, a theoretical yet highly practical tool developed in the peace-building field.

  • One of the first human-wildlife conflict (HWC) books to focus on the marine system
  • Explores the complexity of HWC in marine-based conservation through the 'Level of Conflict' model, a theoretical yet highly practical tool developed in the peace-building field
  • Covers a broad taxonomic and geographic range of case studies
  • Identifies key concepts and common themes, translating them into an applied focus and communicating best practices

About the Author(s)

Edited by Megan Draheim, Visiting Assistant Professor, Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability, Virginia Tech, Francine Madden, Executive Director, Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration (HWCC), Julie-Beth McCarthy, Independent Researcher, and Chris Parsons, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science & Policy, George Mason University

Dr Megan Draheim is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Virginia Tech's Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability, located outside of Washington, D.C, where she teaches in the Masters of Natural Resource program. Her focus is on human-wildlife interactions (both positive and negative) in marine and terrestrial systems and how these can help or hurt conservation. Her research has ranged from marine mammal tourism in the Dominican Republic to urban coyotes outside of Denver, Colorado. She received her PhD from George Mason University's Department of Environmental Science and Policy, an interdisciplinary program that gives equal weight to natural science, social science, and policy.

Francine Madden is the co-Founder and Executive Director of the Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration-a nonprofit organization integrating "conservation conflict transformation " strategies in wildlife conservation efforts. Francine has successfully facilitated conflict intervention, planning, and capacity building processes in some of the world's most fragile hotspots. Francine has helped people and projects significantly curtail wildlife poaching and trafficking, reconcile fractured and relationships, and dramatically improve overall social receptivity toward and decision-making for wildlife conservation on every continent where humans and wildlife coexist. Francine Madden has two masters' degrees from Indiana University and is the author of numerous publications and presentations.

Julie-Beth McCarthy is a marine conservation professional and scholar. She received her MSc in Biodiversity, Conservation, and Management from Oxford University's Centre for the Environment in 2010. Ms. McCarthy holds both a Biology degree and a Religious Studies degree from the University of Calgary which focused on biodiversity conservation, environmental ethics, and connecting religious communities with ecological conservation. She has presented on the role of religions in environmental processes to the general public, academics, and various religious community members. Ms. McCarthy has volunteered her time to many conservation initiatives globally and holds a certificate in Wildlife Rehabilitation & Husbandry from Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.

Dr Chris Parsons has been involved in whale and dolphin research for over two decades. He is an Associate Professor at George Mason University as well as the undergraduate coordinator for their environmental science program. He's been a member of the scientific committee of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) for 15 years and has been involved in organizing three of the International Marine Conservation Congresses (IMCC) (the world's largest academic marine conservation conference). In addition, Dr. Parsons has published over 100 scientific papers and book chapters and has written a textbook on marine mammal biology & conservation.

Table of Contents

    Introduction, Megan M. Draheim, Francine Madden, Julie-Beth McCarthy, and E.C.M. Parsons
    Section 1: Introduction to the Levels of Conflict
    1: Understanding Social Conflict and Complexity in the Marine Environment, Francine Madden and Brian McQuinn
    Section 2: Policy and Human-Wildlife Conflict
    2: Conservation on island time: Stakeholder participation and conflict in marine resource management, Catherine Booker and d'Shan Maycock
    3: Transforming wicked environmental problems in the government arena: A case study of the effects of marine sound on marine mammals, Jill Lewandowski
    4: Conservation in conflict: An overview of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) management in Samaná, Dominican Republic, Christine Gleason
    5: Levels of marine human-wildlife conflict: A whaling case study, E.C.M. Parsons
    6: Conflict and collaboration in marine conservation work: Transcending boundaries and encountering flamingos, Sarah Wise
    Section 3: Narratives and Human-Wildlife Conflict
    7: Hawaiian monk seals: Labels, names, and stories in conflict, Rachel S. Sprague and Megan M. Draheim
    8: Flipper fallout: Dolphins as cultural workers and the human conflicts that ensue, Carlie Wiener
    9: Examining identity-level conflict: The role of religion, Julie-Beth McCarthy
    Conclusion, Megan M. Draheim, Julie-Beth McCarthy, E.C.M. Parsons

Reviews

"One of the goals of this book is to inject new concepts into old conflicts" - Joe Roman, Trends in Ecology and Evolution

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