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How to Succeed in Organic Chemistry

Mark C. Elliott

March 2020

ISBN: 9780198851295

520 pages
Paperback
246x171mm

In Stock

Price: £24.99

The most student-centred, 'learn by doing' approach to organic chemistry: build confidence, master key skills, make organic chemistry second nature.

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Description

An honest, motivating, and supportive guide to the essential principles of organic reaction mechanisms, which ingrains in the reader all the skills needed to be successful in their studies.

  • Speaks the language of students to provide an honest, motivating and supportive guide to the subject
  • Content is presented in short, easy-to-digest chapters to make learning as efficient and effective as possible
  • The focus throughout is on active learning, with an emphasis on organic chemistry being a set of skills that can be mastered, not a series of reactions that need to be memorised
  • Accompanying videos feature the author discussing solutions to the problems featured in the text to provide even further support and explanation
  • Also available as an e-book enhanced with the author videos embedded into the text, to offer a fully immersive experience and extra learning support

About the Author(s)

Mark C. Elliott, Senior Lecturer in Organic Chemistry and Deputy Director of Learning and Teaching, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University

Dr Mark Elliott is Senior Lecturer in Organic Chemistry and Deputy Director of Learning and Teaching in the Department of Chemistry at Cardiff University. His research interests lie in the development of new synthetic methodology, and its application to target synthesis. He teaches organic chemistry at all levels of the undergraduate curriculum.

Table of Contents

    Section 1: Laying the Foundations
    Basics 1: Structures of Organic Compounds
    Habit 1: Always Draw Structures with Realistic Geometry
    Basics 2: Functional Groups and "R" Groups
    Basics 3: Naming Organic Compounds
    Practice 1: Drawing Structures from Chemical Names
    Basics 4: Isomerism in Organic Chemistry - Constitutional Isomers
    Practice 2: Constitutional Isomers and Chemical Names
    Habit 2: Identifying When a Formula is Possible
    Practice 3: Double Bond Equivalents
    Common Error 1: Formulae, Functional Groups and Double Bond Equivalents
    Habit 3: Ignore What Doesn't Change
    Basics 5: Electronegativity, Bond Polarisation and Inductive Effects
    Practice 4: Bond Polarisation and Electronegativity
    Basics 6: Bonding in Organic Compounds
    Practice 5: Hybridisation
    Basics 7: Bonding and Antibonding Orbitals
    Basics 8: Introduction to Curly Arrows
    Fundamental Reaction Type 1: Nucleophilic Substitution at Saturated Carbon
    Practice 6: Electronegativity in Context
    Fundamental Reaction Type 2: Elimination Reactions
    Section 2: Building on the Foundations
    Basics 9: Breaking Bonds – Linking Curly Arrows and Molecular Orbitals
    Common Error 2: Curly Arrows
    Basics 10: Conjugation and Resonance
    Basics 11: Thermodynamic Definitions
    Basics 12: Bond Dissociation Energy
    Basics 13: Calculating Enthalpy of Reaction from Bond Dissociation Energies
    Perspective 1: A Closer Look at Bond Dissociation Energies
    Practice 7: Calculating Enthalpy of Reaction from Bond Dissociation Energy
    Basics 14: Energetics and Reaction Profiles
    Basics 15: How Fast Are Reactions?
    Basics 16: Introduction to Carbocations, Carbanions and Free-Radicals
    Basics 17: Carbocations 2 - More Factors Affecting Stability
    Basics 18: Carbanions 2 - Stability and pKa
    Perspective 2: A Scale for Carbocation Stability
    Common Error 3: Methyl Groups are Electron-Releasing
    Practice 8: Drawing Resonance Forms for Carbocations and Carbanions
    Common Error 4: Resonance
    Basics 19: The Hammond Postulate
    Basics 20: Conjugation and Stability - The Evidence
    Common Error 5: Carbocations and Carbanions
    Basics 21: Reactivity of Conjugated Systems
    Basics 22: Acid Catalysis in Organic Reactions Part 1
    Reaction Detail 1: Nucleophilic Substitution at Saturated Carbon
    Basics 23: What Defines a Transition State?
    Perspective 3: Bonding Beyond Hybridisation
    Fundamental Knowledge Recap 1: Bond Lengths and Strengths
    Fundamental Knowledge Recap 2: pKa
    Section 3: A Focus on Shape
    Habit 4: Representing Stereochemistry - Flying Wedge and Newman Projections
    Basics 23: Isomerism in Organic Chemistry - Configurational Isomers
    Habit 5: Getting Used to Drawing Stereoisomers
    Practice 9: Getting Used to Stereoisomers
    Habit 6: Assignment of Stereochemistry - The Cahn-Ingold-Prelog Rules
    Practice 10: Assigning Stereochemistry
    Habit 7: Stereoisomers with Symmetry
    Basics 25: Properties of Stereoisomers
    Reaction Detail 2: Stereochemical Aspects of Substitution Reactions
    Common Error 6: Substitution Reactions
    Reaction Detail 3: Substitution with Retention of Configuration
    Common Error 7: Stereochemical Errors
    Section 4: Types of Selectivity
    Basics 26: Selectivity in Organic Chemistry - Chemoselectivity
    Basics 27: Selectivity in Organic Chemistry - Regioselectivity
    Basics 28: Selectivity in Organic Chemistry - Stereoselectivity
    Basics 29: Stereochemical Definitions Relating to Reactions
    Section 5: Bonds Can Rotate
    Basics 30: Isomerism in Organic Chemistry - Conformational Isomers
    Practice 11: Conformational Analysis
    Applications 1: Conformational Isomers 2
    Applications 2: SN2 Substitution Reactions Forming Three-Membered Rings
    Basics 31: Introduction to Cyclohexanes
    Practice 12: Drawing Cyclohexanes
    Applications 3: Substitution Reactions of Cyclohexanes
    Basics 32: Quantifying Conformers of Cyclohexanes
    Basics 33: More Conformers of Cyclohexanes and Related Compounds
    Practice 13: Drawing More Complex Cyclohexanes
    Common Error 8: Cyclohexanes
    Section 6: Eliminating the Learning
    Reaction Detail 4: Elimination Reactions
    Perspective 4: A Continuum of Mechanisms
    Basics 34: More Substituted Alkenes Are More Stable
    Basics 35: Enthalpy Changes for Reactions Involving Anionic Species
    Applications 4: Stereochemistry of Elimination Reactions
    Basics 36: Stereospecificity
    Applications 5: Elimination Reactions of Cyclohexanes
    Common Error 9: Elimination Reaction
    Reaction Detail 5: Allylic Substitution
    Section 7: Building Skills
    Worked Problem 1: Curly Arrows and Reaction Profiles
    Worked Problem 2: Competing SN1 Substitution and E1 Elimination
    Worked Problem 3: Competing SN2 Substitution and E2 Elimination
    Worked Problem 4: Acid Catalysis in Organic Reactions Part 2
    Worked Problem 5: Epoxide Opening Reactions
    Worked Problem 6: Is cis-Cyclohexane-1,2-diol Really Achiral?
    Worked Problem 7: The Furst-Plattner Rule
    Worked Problem 8: SN2' Stereochemistry and Conformations
    Worked Problem 9: Complex Substitution Stereochemistry
    Worked Problem 10: Cyclisation Reactions
    Solution to Problem 1: Curly Arrows and Reaction Profiles
    Solution to Problem 2: Competing SN1 Substitution and E1 Elimination
    Solution to Problem 3: Competing SN2 Substitution and E2 Elimination
    Solution to Problem 4: Acid Catalysis in Organic Reactions Part 2
    Solution to Problem 5: Epoxide Opening Reactions
    Solution to Problem 6: Is cis-Cyclohexane-1,2-diol Really Achiral?
    Solution to Problem 7: The Furst-Plattner Rule
    Solution to Problem 8: SN2' Stereochemistry and Conformations
    Solution to Problem 9: Complex Substitution Stereochemistry
    Solution to Problem 10: Cyclisation Reactions

Reviews

"I liked the slightly informal tone of writing, almost as if I was being taught one-to-one by the author. It felt personal and honest, as if the author wrote the book to help me personally. " - Stephen Robertson, student, University of York

"This book would be a chemistry student's friend. It is different to any I have read before. There is a comforting level of informality, where you felt like your friend was going through and explaining things to you. " - Yasmine Biddick, student, University of Birmingham

"This text represents a new way to teach organic chemistry and produce independent, critically thinking chemists; it acknowledges the connected world in which students live and utilises that to avoid the traditional endless lists of reactions for rote learning. Instead, this text focuses on the discipline and practice required by the novice and gives them the tools to become an expert." - Dr Jennifer Slaughter, Department of Chemistry, University of Manchester

"This is a unique textbook that does something no other text does - it speaks the language of the modern student and is formatted with that in mind." - Professor Mark Bagley, Department of Chemistry, University of Sussex

Additional Resources

Digital formats and resources
How to Succeed in Organic Chemistry is supported by online resources and is available for students and institutions to purchase in a variety of formats.

  • The e-book is enhanced with more than 60 embedded author videos which discuss and offer solutions to problems posed in the text, to offer a fully immersive experience and extra learning support. www.oxfordtextbooks.co.uk/ebooks
  • These videos are also available as a stand-alone online resource for use alongside the print book. To access the videos from the print book, simply visit the online resource link inside the front cover of your copy of the book, using the unique access code printed there to register. Here, lecturers can also access the free-to-download figures from the book for use in their teaching.

    How to Succeed in Organic Chemistry has its own Facebook page, where the author posts regular updates, as well as links related to educational philosophy. Readers can post to this page and ask questions which the author and others in the group will endeavour to answer.

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