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Decolonization: A Very Short Introduction

Dane Kennedy

28 April 2016

ISBN: 9780199340491

136 pages
Paperback
175x111mm

In Stock

Very Short Introductions

Price: £8.99

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Description

This succinct and insightful account of decolonization analyses the tumultuous events that caused the shift from a world of colonial empires to a world of nation-states in the years after World War II.

  • Leads to a better understanding of the process of decolonization, as well as its impact on contemporary international relations.
  • Provides a long historical perspective that notes prior waves of decolonization.
  • Makes a case for empires' abilities to adjust to the age of the nation-state.

About the Author(s)

Dane Kennedy, Dr. Professor of History and International Affairs, George Washington University

Dane Kennedy is the Elmer Louis Kayser Professor of History and International Affairs at George Washington University and the Director of the National History Center. He is the author of five previous books on aspects of British imperial history as well as editor or co-editor of several others. He is a founding member of the International Decolonization Seminar faculty, which ran from 2006 to 2015.

Table of Contents

    1 Waves of Decolonization
    2 Global War's Colonial Consequences
    3 The Deluge
    4 The Problem of the Nation-State
    5 Imperial Continuities and the Politics of Amnesia
    References
    Further Reading
    Index

Reviews

"Kennedy's brief book will undoubtedly become a key resource for teaching the end of empire. It serves as an ideal launching point for anyone new to the field, whether they are interested in gaining a general understanding of decolonization or in finding ways to delve more deeply into the complications, chronologies, and meanings of the end of empire." - Elisabeth Leake, The American Historical Review