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Cover

Borders: A Very Short Introduction

Alexander C. Diener and Joshua Hagen

September 2012

ISBN: 9780199731503

152 pages
Paperback
174x111mm

In Stock

Very Short Introductions

Price: £8.99

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Description

Borders: A Very Short Introduction offers insights into the form and function of historical and contemporary political and social boundaries. The authors show how and why borders have been, are currently, and will undoubtedly remain controversial topics and at the forefront of global headlines for years to come.

  • Written to serve as a gateway for readers new to border studies
  • Offers both a historical and contemporary treatment of borders
  • Provides readers with a basic understanding of the importance of borders to debates about the environment, politics, immigration, and economics
  • Covers transnational communities, security threats from terrorist groups, migration regulation, rights of indigenous peoples, the legal status of the sea and outer space), environmental sustainability, and the emergence of neo-liberal economics, amongst other topics

About the Author(s)

Alexander C. Diener, Assistant Professor of Geography, University of Kansas, US, and Joshua Hagen, Professor of Geography, Marshall University, US

Alexander C. Diener is an Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of Kansas. Joshua Hagen is Professor of Geography at Marshall University.

Table of Contents

    Chapter 1: A Very Bordered World
    Chapter 2: Borders and Territory in the Ancient World
    Chapter 3: The Modern State System
    Chapter 4: The Practice of Bordering
    Chapter 5: Border Crossers and Border Crossings
    Chapter 6: Cross-border Institutions and Systems
    Chapter 7: A Very Bordered Future
    Further Reading
    Index

Reviews

"This book offers a rich introduction for research into the amorphous nature of human social-spatial organization." - Gregory Lee Cuellar, Horizons in Biblical Theology

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