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Cover

American Women's History: A Very Short Introduction

Susan Ware

January 2015

ISBN: 9780199328338

160 pages
Paperback
175x111mm

In Stock

Very Short Introductions

Price: £8.99

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Description

What does U.S. history look like with women at the center of the story? From Pocahantas to military women serving in the Iraqi war, this Very Short Introduction chronicles the contributions that women have made to the American experience from a multicultural perspective that emphasizes how gender shapes women's—and men's—lives.

  • Looks at women's role in the civil rights movement and the revival of feminism
  • A truly multicultural approach to women's history that emphasizes the diversity of American women's experiences
  • Considers the changing historical and cultural construction of gender roles
  • Draws on author's four decades of experience researching and teaching U.S. women's history

About the Author(s)

Susan Ware, General editor, American National Biography

A pioneer in the field of women's history and a leading feminist biographer, Susan Ware is the author and editor of numerous books on twentieth-century U.S. history. She currently serves as general editor of the American National Biography.

Table of Contents

    List of illustrations
    Preface
    Chapter 1: In the Beginning: North America's Women to 1750
    Chapter 2: Freedom's Ferment, 1750-1848
    Chapter 3: The Challenges of Citizenship, 1848-1920
    Chapter 4: Modern American Women, 1920 to the present
    References
    Further reading
    Index

Reviews

"I imagine that a reader new to U.S. women's history would come away from this book with a sense of the ways in which race, ethnicity, and class intersect with gender and the forces that have shaped women's lives from the past into the present. And that is the intent of the volume." - Leila J. Rupp, The American Historical Review

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