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Cover

Lab Manual to Accompany William Norton's Human Geography

Eighth Edition

Bram Noble, Paul Hackett, and Jill Gunn

Publication Date - September 2013

ISBN: 9780195448566

144 pages
Paperback
11.0 x 8.5 inches

Description

This Lab Manual is focused on problem solving and practical applications in human geography. It helps students develop a variety of essential geographic skills grounded in human geography, which they can subsequently build upon in upper-level courses. It also enhances classroom discussion and understanding of major geographical concepts and approaches to problem solving. The workbook emphasizes cartographic, qualitative, and quantitative approaches to data collection, problem solving, analysis, and results presentation and interpretation. The modules contain exercises designed for students to carry out in the classroom, field setting, computer lab, and various combinations of these. The workbook also includes case studies that are designed for independent reading and thinking and to facilitate in-class discussion.

Features

  • Balanced coverage: Modules provide hands-on exercises on topics related to all of the chapters in the text.
  • Canadian content: Labs familiarize students with applying their understanding to various Canadian scenarios (e.g., the North American Great Lakes, interprovincial migration in Canada, and settlement patterns in Canadian communities).
  • Class-tested content: Manual developed based on a set of lab exercises the authors have taught successfully in courses over several years.

About the Author(s)

Bram Noble, Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan,Paul Hackett, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan,Jill Gunn, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan


Bram Noble is professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Saskatchewan. His research is focused primarily on environmental assessment methodology and application, and he is interested in the broad field of resource and environmental planning and management in general.

Paul Hackett is an assistant professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Saskatchewan. His current research focuses on the historical and geographical patterns of the health of western Canada's First Nations.

Jill Gunn is an assistant professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Saskatchewan. Her current research has focused on the integration and application of strategic environmental assessment and cumulative effects assessment on a regional basis in Canada.

Previous Publication Date(s)

August 2010
July 2010

Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. Understanding Human Geography
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. Constructing and Validating a Mental Map
    B. Field Sketch Mapping Using Scale
    References
    2. Space, Place, and Globalization
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. Spatial Interaction
    B. Critical Distance
    C. Time-Space Convergence
    D. Diffusion
    E. Does Geography Still Matter?
    References
    3. Human Impacts on the Natural Environment
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    Note to Instructor
    A. Case Study 1: East Coast Marine Fisheries
    B. Case Study 2: The North American Great Lakes
    C. Managing Common Property Resources
    D. Short Essay: Limits to Growth
    E. Questions for Classroom Discussion
    References
    4. Measuring Population Growth
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. Population Pyramids
    B. Dependency Ratios
    C. Sex (Gender) Ratios
    References
    5. Population Patterns and Movement
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. Population Patterns: Mapping Density in Saskatchewan
    B. Interprovincial Migration in Canada
    C. Understanding Migration: A Case Study
    References
    6. Cultural Landscapes
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. The Metis and the Epidemiologic Transition
    B. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Canada's First Nations: The Role of Culture
    C. Aboriginal Languages in Canada
    D. Identity in Canada
    References
    7. Social Well-Being
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. Food Deserts
    B. Income and Food Deserts
    C. Health Consequences of Food Insecurity
    References
    8. Political Geographies
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. Geography of the General Elections
    B. Who Participates?
    C. Tightening Borders
    D. The Politics of Natural Resources
    References
    9. The Changing Agricultural Landscape
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. The Geography of Agricultural Production
    B. The Changing Practice of Summer Fallow
    C. Intensification of the Agricultural Industry
    D. What Are Your Food Kilometres?
    References
    10. Urban Settlement Patterns and Impacts
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. Common Settlement Patterns
    B. Settlement Patterns in Canadian Communities
    C. Comparing Past and Present Suburban Development Standards
    D. Urban Growth and Impacts to Natural Areas
    References
    11. Urban Economies and Transportation
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. Urban Retail Markets
    B. Network Connectivity
    C. Main Street Economic Profile
    D. Main Street: Degree of Attractiveness
    References
    12. Understanding the Industrial Landscape
    Introduction
    Key Concepts
    Learning Objectives and Skill Development
    Tools Required
    A. The Changing Canadian Labour Force
    B. Industrial Location
    C. Export-Processing Zones
    D. Employment Multipliers
    References

Related Title

Human Geography