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Table of Contents

Preface
Abbreviations
About the contributors
World map

Introduction, Pauline Kerr and Geoffrey Wiseman
The diplomacy puzzle
Historical background, contemporary trends, and challenges for diplomacy
The book's structure, chapter summaries, and pedagogical features

PART I. THE HISTORICAL EVOLUTION OF DIPLOMACY

Chapter 1. Diplomacy through the Ages, Raymond Cohen
Introduction
Ancient Near Eastern diplomacy
Classical diplomacy
European diplomacy
Conclusion

Chapter 2. Past Diplomacy in East Asia: From Tributary Relations to Cold War Rivalry, Suisheng Zhao
Introduction
Collapse of the traditional East Asian order and the tributary system
Japan's military expansion and the diplomacy of imperialism
Cold War diplomacy in East Asia
Diplomacy during the deterioration of the East Asian bipolar system
Diplomacy of the strategic triangle
Conclusion

PART II. CONCEPTS AND THEORIES OF CONTEMPORARY DIPLOMACY

Chapter 3. Diplomacy in International Relations Theory and Other Disciplinary Perspectives, Paul Sharp
Introduction: The attractions and limitations of theory
Diplomacy in international theory
Diplomats in social theory
Diplomatic theory
Postpositivist diplomatic theory
Conclusion

Chapter 4. Debates about Contemporary and Future Diplomacy, Geoffrey Allen Pigman
Introduction: Debating diplomacy
Debating what we mean by "diplomacy"
Debating continuity and change in contemporary diplomacy
Debating theory and practice in contemporary diplomacy
Conclusion: How debates about diplomacy are, or are not, resolved

Chapter 5. Transnationalizing Diplomacy and Global Governance, Bertrand Badie
Introduction
From interstate toward intersocial diplomacy
Non-state actor participation in world politics
Intersocial diplomacies versus interstate diplomacies
Global governance and the declining resilience of the state
Conclusion

Chapter 6. Diplomacy as Negotiation and Mediation, I. William Zartman
Introduction
Negotiation and diplomacy
Expanding the scope of diplomacy
Challenging the processes of negotiation: mediation and multilateral diplomacy
Facing the future of diplomatic negotiation: Prevention
Conclusion

PART III. STRUCTURES, PROCESSES, AND INSTRUMENTS OF CONTEMPO

Chapter 7. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the National Diplomatic System, Brian Hocking
Introduction
The ministry of foreign affairs (MFA): Diplomatic perspectives
The MFA and the national diplomatic system (NDS)
The emergence and evolution of the MFA
The MFA and the NDS in the twenty-first century
Conclusion

Chapter 8. The Impact of the Internet and ICT on Contemporary Diplomacy, Jovan Kurbalija
Introduction
Historical background: The telegraph and diplomacy
Changing the environment for diplomacy
A new issue on diplomatic agendas
A new tool for diplomatic activities
Conclusion

Chapter 9. Consular Diplomacy, Halvard Leira and Iver B. Neumann
Introduction
Definitional issues
Emergence and development of consular tasks and offices
The consul and the diplomat
The consul today
Conclusion

Chapter 10. Bilateral and Multilateral Diplomacy in Normal Times and in Crises, Thomas Wright
Introduction
Distinguishing bilateralism and multilateralism
Distinguishing between forms of multilateralism
Understanding the contemporary international order
The challenge of a power transition
Conclusion

Chapter 11. Public Diplomacy, Jan Melissen
Introduction: the rise of a practice and a field of study
The epiphenomenal nature of public diplomacy
Official and nongovernmental public diplomacy
Beyond the new public diplomacy: evolving concepts
Public diplomacy outside the West
Conclusion

Chapter 12. Economic Diplomacy, Stephen Woolcock
Introduction
What is economic diplomacy?
What makes economic diplomacy important?
Is economic diplomacy distinctive?
Conclusion

Chapter 13. Track-Two Diplomacy in East Asia, Pauline Kerr and Brendan Taylor
Introduction: Debates about diplomacy and track-two diplomacy
An analytical framework and methodology for investigating track-two diplomacy
The practice of track-two diplomacy in East Asia: environmental, security, and economic issues
Explaining track-two diplomacy in East Asia
Conclusion

Chapter 14. Diplomacy and Intelligence, Jennifer E. Sims
Introduction: Exploring the "dark arts" in international politics and diplomacy
Defining intelligence, deception, and covert action
Ethical issues: How dark are the dark arts?
Looking to the future
Conclusion

PART IV. NATIONAL, REGIONAL, AND INTERNATIONAL DIPLOMATIC PRACTICES

Chapter 15. United States Contemporary Diplomacy: Implementing a Foreign Policy of "Engagement," Alan K. Henrikson
Introduction: Foreign policy as diplomatic process
Containment: Negotiating (only) from a position of strength
Transformation: Putting (others') domestic affairs at the center of foreign policy
Engagement: Talking with enemies as well as (just) with friends
Conclusion: Diplomacy now the primary means, but not the end of policy

Chapter 16. China's Contemporary Diplomacy, Ye Zicheng and Zhang Qingmin
Introduction
The context of China's contemporary diplomacy
Evolving diplomatic strategies and thinking
Proactive multilateral diplomacy
An omnidirectional diplomatic structure
The broadening of diplomatic arenas
Multilevel foreign relations and diplomacy
Conclusion

Chapter 17. Regional Institutional Diplomacies: Europe, Asia, Africa, South America and Other Regions, Jozef Bátora and Alan Hardacre
Introduction
Diplomacy as an institution and the challenge of regional institutional diplomatic systems
EU regional institutional diplomacy
Regional diplomacy in Asia
Regional diplomacy in Africa
Regional diplomacy in South America
Other regional diplomatic systems
Conclusion

Chapter 18. The United Nations, Geoffrey Wiseman and Soumita Basu
Introduction
Historical origins and emergence
Main UN organs
Evolution of diplomatic practices
The diplomatic community
Conclusion

Conclusion, Geoffrey Wiseman and Pauline Kerr
Introduction
How is diplomacy changing?
Why is diplomacy changing?
Implications for future theories and practices
Complex diplomacy
Glossary
References
Index


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