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Chapter 4

Melody

Sound Example 4.1 A sentence of British English, corresponding to Figures 4.2, 4.3, and 4.4 (pp. 186, 187, 188, 189).

Sound Example 4.2 A sentence of British English, corresponding to Figure 4.5 (p. 191).

Sound Example 4.3 A sentence of continental French, corresponding to Figure 4.6 (pp. 192, 193).

Sound Example 4.4 A synthesized sentence of English, with either English or French intonation. Note that the version with French intonation also has French-style pronunciation of the individual phonemes, and hence a French accent at both the phonemic and prosodic levels. Listen for the intonation pattern, as discussed in the book (p. 192). Courtesy of Gunnar Fant.

4.4A English sentence with English intonation
4.4B English sentence with French intonation

Sound Example 4.5 Two short melodies illustrating the influence of tonality relations on the perception of a tone"s stability. Listen to the two melodies before reading the text below. For each melody, try to decide whether the last tone sounds like a stable point of repose or an unstable note that requires resolution (p. 201).

4.5A
4.5B

In 4.5A the final tone acts as scale degree 1 of the melody (the tonic) and conveys a feeling of stability or repose.

In 4.5B the final tone acts as scale degree 7 of the melody (the leading tone) and conveys a feeling of instability, as if the melody is incomplete.

Note that the final tones in these two examples are physically identical: Both are a "B" (B4, ~ 494 Hz). The difference in the perceived stability of this pitch in the two melodies results from its position in the pitch hierarchy of the prevailing key. In 4.5A, the pitch is the tonic of the prevailing the key (B major). In 4.5B, the pitch is the leading tone of the prevailing key (C major). Melodies composed by Jason Rosenberg.

Sound Example 4.6 K0016 with a sour note (p. 201).

Sound Example 4.7 K0016 with a chordal accompaniment (p. 202).

Sound Example 4.8 A sentence of continental French, corresponding to Figure 4.9 (pp. 203, 204).

Sound Example 4.9 A pair of sentences and a corresponding pair of tone analogs (p. 227).

4.9A C"est la SOEUR de Jacques, n"est-ce pas? (speech)
4.9B C"est la soeur de JACQUES, n"est-ce pas? (speech)
4.9C C"est la SOEUR de Jacques, n"est-ce pas? (tone analog)
4.9D C"est la soeur de JACQUES, n"est-ce pas? (tone analog)

Sound Example 4.10 A pair of sentences, a corresponding pair of discrete-tone analogs, and a corresponding pair of gliding-pitch analogs (p. 231).

4.10A Go in FRONT of the bank, I said. (speech)
4.10B Go in front of the BANK, I said. (speech)
4.10C Go in FRONT of the bank, I said. (discrete-tone analog)
4.10D Go in front of the BANK, I said. (discrete-tone analog)
4.10E Go in FRONT of the bank, I said. (gliding-pitch analog)
4.10F Go in front of the BANK, I said. (gliding-pitch analog)



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