Part 2. European Colonization North of Mexico

The Boisterous Sea of Liberty

Part 2. European Colonization North of Mexico

The Boisterous Sea of Liberty

A Documentary History of America from Discovery through the Civil War
$29.99
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Paperback 13/01/2000 ISBN13: 9780195116700 ISBN10: 0195116704 Drawing on a gold mine of primary documents--including letters, diary entries, personal narratives, political speeches, broadsides, trial transcripts, and contemporary newspaper articles--The Boisterous Sea of Liberty brings the past to life in a way few histories ever do.
Here is a panoramic look at early American history as captured in the words of Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe and many other historical figures, both famous and obscure. In these pieces, the living voices of the past speak to us from opposing viewpoints--from the vantage point of loyalists as well as patriots, slaves as well as masters. The documents collected here provide a fuller understanding of such historical issues as Columbus's dealings with Native Americans, the Stamp Act Crisis, the Declaration of Independence, the Whiskey Rebellion, the Missouri Crisis, the Mexican War, and Harpers Ferry, to name but a few.
Compiled by Pulitzer Prize winning historian David Brion Davis and Steven Mintz, and accompanied by extensive illustrations of original documents, The Boisterous Sea of Liberty brings the reader back in time, to meet the men and women who lived through the momentous events that shaped our nation.

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Part 2. European Colonization North of Mexico

Justifications for English Involvement in the New World 46
1. "The Kings of Spain...have rooted out above fifteen millions of reasonable creatures" 46
Richard Hakluyt, "A particular discourse concerning the great necessity and manifold commodities that are like to grow to this Realm of England by the Western discoveries lately attempted," 1584

A Rationale for New World Colonization 48
2. "All...our...trades in all Europe...may...[count] for little...[compared with] America" 48
Richard Hakluyt, A particular discourse concerning the great necessity and manifold commodities that are like to grow to this Realm of England by the Western discoveries lately attempted," 1584

England's First Enduring North American Settlement 50
3. "Being ready with clubs to beat out his brains, Pocahontas...got his head in her arms" 50
John Smith, Generall Historie of Virginia

Life in Early Virginia 52
4. "My brother and my wife are dead" 52
Sebastian Brandt, January 13, 1622

Race War in Virginia 52
5. "They basely and barbarously murdered, not sparing either age or sex" 52
Edward Waterhouse, 1622

Indentured Servitude 54
6. "[Virginia] is reported to be an unhealthy place, a nest of Rogues... [and] dissolute...persons" 54
John Hammond, Leah and Rachel, or, The Two Fruitful Sisters Virginia and Mary-land, 1656

The Shift to Slavery 57
7. "All children...shall be held bond or free only according to the condition of the mother" 57
William Waller Hening, Virginia slave laws, December 1662, September 1667, September 1668, October 1669

Regional Contrasts 59
8. "We walked in the woods amongst wild beasts...at least 20 miles,... expecting to die" 59
Thomas Culpepper, September 20, 1680

The Pilgrims Arrive in Plymouth 60
9. "In 2 or 3 months times, half of their company died" 60
William Bradford, History of Plimouth Plantation, 1620-47

Reasons for Puritan Immigration 63
10. "Most children...are perverted, corrupted, & utterly overthrown by the multitude of evil examples" 63
John Winthrop, Life and Letters of John Winthrop, 1629

The Idea of the Covenant 64
11. "Some must be rich, some poor, some high and eminent in power... others mean and in subjection" 64
John Winthrop, "A Modell of Christian Charity," 1630

Servitude in New England 66
12. "[Ill] reports is given of my Wyfe for beatinge the maid" 66
John Winter, 1639

Mounting Conflict with Native Americans 67
13. "For the number of our people...be in all about 4000 souls" 67
John Winthrop, May 22, 1634

Native Americans as Active Agents 69
14. "The Monhiggin [Mohican]...refuseth to part with his prey" 69
Roger Williams, July 6, 1640

Puritan Economics 70
15. Some false principles are these" 70
John Winthrop, The History of New England, 1640

King Philip's War 71
16. "Various are the reports...of the causes of the present Indian warre" 71
Edward Randolph, 1675

Struggles for Power 73
17. "Take, kill, & destroy [th]e enemy without limitation of place or time" 73
Thomas Danforth, February 17, 1689

An Indian Slave Woman Confesses to Witchcraft 75
18. "Tituba an Indian woman [was] brought before us...upon Suspicion of witchcraft" 75
William E. Woodward, comp., Records of Salem Witchcraft, 1692

19. "The devil is now making one attempt more upon us" 78
Cotton Mather, The Wonders of the Invisible World, 1693

The Sin of Slaveholding 80
20. "Liberty is in real value next to life" 80
Samuel Sewall, The Selling of Joseph: A Memorial, 1700

English Liberties 82
21. "The Constitution of our English Government [is] the best in the World" 82
Henry Care, English Liberties, Or, The Free-Born Subject's Inheritance, 1685