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HE Bioscience Teacher of the Year

HE Bioscience Teacher of the Year

Congratulations to Ian Turner, HE Bioscience Teacher of the Year 2017!

Dr Ian Turner, from the University of Derby, has won the Royal Society of Biology’s prestigious Higher Education Bioscience Teacher of the Year Award 2017.
 
The £1,000 prize was formally awarded on 10th May at the Spring Meeting of the Heads of University Biosciences (HUBS) in Leicester.

Facing strong competition from Dr Sarah Gretton, director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Science, head of pedagogy, and biology coordinator at the University of Leicester, and Professor Kevin Moffat, professorial teaching fellow at the University of Warwick, Ian impressed the judges with his case study, Lecture Theatre Pantomime: Fun learning is better learning. All three finalists wrote case studies and presented them to a judging panel in London, followed by an interview. You can read their case studies, along with those of previous finalists and winners, here.

Peter Heathcote FSB, Professor of Biochemistry at Queen Mary University of London and chair of the judging panel for the award, said: “In his unique approach, Ian uses the lecture theatre as a stage and a variety of learning styles and approaches including role play, props, and analogies to make demanding subjects such as genetics and immunology both enjoyable and accessible to students.

“Testimonials from students, and recognition by academic colleagues and his employer the University of Derby, provided strong evidence to the panel of judges that Ian’s interactive and engaging approach has indeed inspired students to work harder and aspire to be scientists.”

Turner said of receiving the award: “I am delighted and humbled to have received such an award by the Royal Society of Biology. 

“At Derby, we are committed to providing excellent student learning and I am extremely pleased that both the Biosciences Department and the University has been recognised.”

Dr Turner was awarded with the Ed Wood Memorial Prize of £1,000; one year's subscription to an Oxford University Press journal of his choice; and one year's free membership of the Royal Society of Biology. The two finalists will also receive RSB membership and a prize of £150.

Nominations will soon open for the 2018 award. If you know a lecturer who:

  • Displays excellence in designing approaches to teaching that promote student learning and achievement
  • Undertakes scholarly and professional developmental to enhance the learning of their students
  • Supports colleagues and influences bioscience student learning beyond their own department and institution
  • Exhibits innovation in relation to teaching that improves practices and enhances student learning

We would love to hear from them!

About the Award

Launched in 2009, the award is managed by the Royal Society of Biology, and supported by Oxford University Press and Heads of University Biosciences (HUBS). The Award seeks to identify the UK's leading bioscience higher education teachers, recognizing the invaluable role they play in educating and inspiring the next generation of biologists.

The prize rewards lecturers who:

  • Display excellence in designing approaches to teaching that promote student learning and achievement
  • Undertake scholarly and professional developmental to enhance the learning of their students
  • Support colleagues and influences bioscience student learning beyond their own department and institution
  • Exhibit innovation in relation to teaching that improves practices and enhances student learning

The winner receives:

  • the Ed Wood Memorial Prize of £1,000 to spend as they wish
  • one year's subscription to an OUP journal of their choice
  • one year's free Membership of the Royal Society of Biology
  • a free place at the Heads of University Biosciences (HUBS) Spring Meeting

Learn more at the Royal Society of Biology website.

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