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HE Bioscience Teacher of the Year

HE Bioscience Teacher of the Year

The search is on for the UK's best HE Bioscience Teacher...

Launched in 2009, the HE Bioscience Teacher of the Year Award is managed by the Royal Society of Biology, and supported by Oxford University Press and Heads of University Biosciences (HUBS).

The award seeks to identify the UK's leading bioscience higher education teachers, recognizing the invaluable role they play in educating and inspiring the next generation of biologists.

Meet the finalists for the 2017 award

ExpandCloseSarah Gretton, University of Leicester

Sarah GrettonDr Sarah Gretton trained as a virologist, working on hepatitis C virus as a PhD student and as a research fellow.

In 2010, after a brief period as a sessional lecturer, she joined the University of Leicester as a teaching fellow, working on educational research projects in the Genetics Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning and teaching on the Natural Sciences undergraduate programme. She coordinated the biology curriculum on the Natural Sciences course for four years before being appointed as Programme Director in 2015.

Sarah is a Senior Fellow of the HEA and holds a Distinguished University Teaching Fellowship award. She led a finalist entry for the 2016 HEA Collaborative Awards for Teaching Excellence.

Sarah’s interests include Education for Sustainable Development and reward and recognition for teaching-focused academics. Her case study will focus on her work using real-world interdisciplinary science problems with Natural Sciences students.

ExpandCloseKevin Moffat, University of Warwick

Mark ClementsProfessor Kevin Moffat graduated with a degree in Physiology and Biochemistry from the University of Reading. In 1986 he completed a Ph.D. at the then Cranfield Institute of Technology working on Escherichia coli.

Following post-doctoral work in Australia and in the UK he gained a lectureship at the University of Warwick. In 2005 he was awarded the Warwick Award for Teaching Excellence, for his work leading on teaching innovations in the department and organising student placements. More recently he became a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a Founding Fellow of Warwick’s new International Higher Education Academy.

He currently leads and teaches on several biomedical-related courses across all four years of the undergraduate curriculum, and teaches on cross-disciplinary courses for non-science undergraduate students. From 2008 to 2011 he held major teaching administrative positions in the department and now leads the School of Life Science’s outreach activities.

ExpandCloseIan Turner, University of Derby

Dave LewisDr Ian Turner is a Senior Lecturer and Deputy Head of the Department of Natural Science at the University of Derby.

Ian is a passionate advocate of learning and teaching and was named National Teaching Fellow in 2015 in recognition of this. He teaches a broad range of subjects including; genetics, molecular biology and science communication, and enjoys the challenge of engaging large lecture theatres full of students.

His pedagogic research interests are around innovative teaching and assessment, and more recently the use of gamification in Higher Education. Ian believes the passion educators’ display correlates to the engagement and achievement of their students.

He is particularly keen to the teaching approach coined ‘lecture theatre pantomime’ a style based on a more kinaesthetic and active ethos. His case study will offer ways that this style can be incorporated into teaching

What happens next?

One of the key criteria for the award is demonstrating innovation in relation to teaching that has proven to improve teaching practices and enhance student learning.

For Round 2 of the competition, our three finalists will each prepare a case study demonstrating their own teaching innovations. Candidates will present their case studies to the judging panel to help them choose an overall winner.

The winner of the 2017 award will be announced at the HUBS Spring Meeting in May.

About the Award

Launched in 2009, the award is managed by the Royal Society of Biology, and supported by Oxford University Press and Heads of University Biosciences (HUBS). The Award seeks to identify the UK's leading bioscience higher education teachers, recognizing the invaluable role they play in educating and inspiring the next generation of biologists.

The prize rewards lecturers who:

  • Display excellence in designing approaches to teaching that promote student learning and achievement
  • Undertake scholarly and professional developmental to enhance the learning of their students
  • Support colleagues and influences bioscience student learning beyond their own department and institution
  • Exhibit innovation in relation to teaching that improves practices and enhances student learning

The winner receives:

  • the Ed Wood Memorial Prize of £1,000 to spend as they wish
  • one year's subscription to an OUP journal of their choice
  • one year's free Membership of the Royal Society of Biology
  • a free place at the Heads of University Biosciences (HUBS) Spring Meeting

Learn more at the Royal Society of Biology website.

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