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Cover

The Oxford Handbook of Tudor Drama

Edited by Thomas Betteridge and Greg Walker

January 2016

ISBN: 9780198715566

710 pages
Paperback
244x170mm

In Stock

Oxford Handbooks

Price: £30.00

This is the first comprehensive study of Tudor drama that sees the long 16th century from the accession of Henry Tudor to the death of Elizabeth as a whole, taking in the numinous drama of the 'Mystery Plays' and the early work of Shakespeare. It is an invaluable account of current scholarship and an introduction to the complexity of Tudor drama.

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Description

This is the first comprehensive study of Tudor drama that sees the long 16th century from the accession of Henry Tudor to the death of Elizabeth as a whole, taking in the numinous drama of the 'Mystery Plays' and the early work of Shakespeare. It is an invaluable account of current scholarship and an introduction to the complexity of Tudor drama.

  • Comprehensive coverage allows readers to understand the whole early history of drama in Britain
  • Attends to the quasi-dramatic forms - royal entries, processions, ceremonial masques, that were so central to Tudor culture, but are often neglected in accounts of the drama
  • The best established scholars in Europe and the US, coupled with rising stars in the field provide a single-volume guide to the best work in the field, its current state and future direction
  • The book is written throughout with readers in mind, offering a clear sense of why this material matters, and how one might think about it afresh, freed from the old stereotypes

About the Author(s)

Edited by Thomas Betteridge, Professor of English Literature and Drama, Oxford Brookes University, and Greg Walker, Regius Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature, University of Edinburgh

Thomas Betteridge is Professor of English Literature and Drama at Oxford Brookes University. His books include Tudor Histories of the English Reformations (1999), Literature and Politics in the English Reformation (2004) and Shakespearean Fantasy and Politics (2005). He is currently working on a study of Sir Thomas More's writing to be published by Notre Dame Press 2012. Professor Betteridge was project leader of the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded research project Staging the Henrician Court and the Wellcome Trust funded project Medicine, Birth and Death at the Tudor Court.

Greg Walker is Regius Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature at the University of Edinburgh and Head of the School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures, having previously been the University's Masson Professor of English Literature. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, The English Association and the Society of Antiquaries. Greg's research is primarily focused on the literary and political history of the late medieval period and the sixteenth century, although he has also published on modern popular music and the films of Alexander Korda. He is interested in the history of the stage, and in the cultural consequences of the Henrician Reformation. His most recent books are Writing under Tyranny: English Literature and the Henrician Reformation (OUP, 2005) and The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Literature in English (OUP, 2010), co-edited with Elaine Treharne.

Table of Contents

    Introduction: 'When Lyberte ruled': Tudor Drama 1485 - 1603, Thomas Betteridge and Greg Walker
    Religious Drama
    1: The Chester Cycle: Creation and Old Testament Plays, Sheila Christie
    2: The York Creation Pageant, Greg Walker
    3: The Croxton Play of the Sacrament, Elisabeth Dutton
    4: The Digby Plays - Mary Magdalene and Wisdom, Vincent Gillespie
    5: Everyman, c.1516, Andrew Hadfield
    6: The Three Laws, John Bale, 1538, James Simpson
    7: Christus Triumphans, John Foxe, 1556, Andreas Hoefele
    8: The Conflict of Conscience, 1572, Anna Rhiel
    9: Dr Faustus, Christopher Marlowe, 1588?, David Lawton
    Interludes and Comedies
    10: Fulgens and Lucrece, Henry Medwall, 1497, Clare Wright
    11: Gentleness and Nobility, John Rastell, c.1529, Daniel Wakelin
    12: The Play of the Weather, John Heywood, 1529-33, Pam King
    13: Wit and Science, John Redford, 1539-47, Meg Twycross
    14: Nice Wanton, 1550, John J McGavin
    15: Lusty Juventus, R. Wever, 1550, Jane Griffiths
    16: Gammer Gurton's Needle, W. Stevenson?, 1553, Alan J Fletcher
    17: Damon and Pythias, Richard Edwards, 1564, Jennifer Richards
    18: The Three Ladies of London, Robert Wilson, 1581, Claire Jowitt
    19: Endymion, John Lyly, 1588, Leah Scragg
    20: The Comedy of Errors, William Shakespeare, c. 1592, Alison Findlay
    21: Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay, Robert Greene, 1592, Sarah Knight
    Entertainments, Masques, and Royal Entries
    22: The Funeral of Henry VII, 1509, Sam Wood
    23: The Coronation of Anne Boleyn, Nicholas Udall, 1533, Tracy Sowerby
    24: Greenwich, 1527, Halle's Chronicle, c.1540, Kent Rawlinson
    25: The Entertainment at Woodstock, George Gascoigne, 1575, Erzsébet Stróbl
    26: Love and Fortune, 1580, Allyna Ward
    Histories and political dramas
    27: Youth and Hick Scorner, 1513, Eleanor Rycroft
    28: Magnfyfcence, John Skelton, c.1519, Peter Happè
    29: King Johan, John Bale, c.1538, Philip Schwyzer
    30: Respublica, Nicholas Udall, c.1554, Sarah Carpenter
    31: Thyestes, Jasper Heywood, 1560 & Agamemnon, Mike Pincombe
    32: Gorboduc, Thomas Norton & Thomas Sackville, 1562, Alice Hunt
    33: The Spanish Tragedy, Thomas Kyd, 1587, Richard Hillman
    34: Tamburlane The Great, Christopher Marlowe, 1590, Janette Dillon
    35: The Troublesome Reign of King John, 1591, Stephen Longstaffe
    36: Henry VI Part 2, William Shakespeare, c.1590, Dermot Cavanagh
    37: Arden of Faversham, 1592, Ros King
    38: Titus Andronicus, William Shakespeare, c.1593, Thomas Betteridge

Reviews

"provides an exhaustive overview of a period of Renaissance drama that many of us probably know less about than we'd care to admit. Covering the period from 1485 to 1603, the volume includes thirty-eight essays on religious drama; interludes and comedies; entertainments, masques, and royal entries; and histories and political dramas." - Kevin Curran, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900

"stimulating and provocative" - Lucy Munro, The Times Literary Supplement

"The book is essential for students of English Renaissance drama and experienced scholars will also find ground-breaking material here." - Frank Swannack, Parergon