08 Artwork

Contents

- Five basic instructions

- How to check the resolution of a photograph in a TIFF or JPEG file

- Originating your artwork

- Sourcing your artwork

By ‘artwork’ we refer to all non-textual material. These are often referred to as ‘figures’, ‘line drawings’, ‘illustrations’, ‘halftones’, and ‘photographs’.

You can produce artwork that is print-ready or artwork that requires some input from a typesetter or illustrator. Instructions in this document are for authors who are not supplying ‘print-ready’ artwork.

There are also more Detailed Artwork Guidelines for all authors, which include additional information, as well as guidance for authors supplying print-ready artwork.

Tip! Used effectively, artwork can significantly improve the clarity of the messages you are trying to convey; do not let them become an afterthought! Where possible, prepare them at the same time as you are writing the chapter.

Five basic instructions

There are five basic instructions to follow:

  • keep records;
  • get permission;
  • place and cue artwork;
  • submit artwork correctly;
  • submit photographs at the right resolution.

Keep records

Keep a record of the artwork you are including in your title using the OUP Artwork Log. This will help you and your OUP Editor to keep track of everything during the writing and production stages.

Tip! If your title has a plate section and in-text images, you must be clear which figures go where.

Get permission

If the artwork has not been originated by you (or a member of your author team), you must get permission to use it from the copyright holder; see Copyright Permissions.

Tip! Be wary of using a photograph of Fine Art (even if it is your own). You will need permission, and it could be expensive.

Place and cue artwork

Within the text, you must:

Instruction Example

1. Refer to the artwork in the text (this is sometimes referred to as a ‘call out’).

This is shown in Figure 1.1.

2. Include a placement indicator in the manuscript to show where the artwork should be placed.

<Insert Figure 1.1>

3. Write a caption beneath this cue or list all captions, for each chapter, in a separate document.

Figure 1.1 A Chihuahua (left) and a Great Dane (right). Dogs have the widest range of body sizes among mammals.

Tip! Figures should be able to stand alone from the text. Captions should explain the figure in full.

Submit artwork correctly

  • Do not insert the actual artwork into the chapter; just use placement cues, as explained above.
  • Save every piece of artwork as a separate file using the artwork number to name the file (see Example 1). Number figures sequentially by chapter—for example, Figure 1.4 is the fourth figure in Chapter 1.
  • Submit on a CD or using a file-sharing site, along with your completed artwork log.

image
Example 1

Submit photographs at the right resolution

All photographs must have a resolution of 300dpi with a measurement in print of at least 4 × 6 inches (or 10 × 15 centimetres). Photographs with a resolution less than this will not be included.

How to check the resolution of a photograph in a TIFF or JPEG file

To check the printable size of your photographs, find the pixel dimensions of the image using Windows Explorer or another program (usually under ‘Properties’). Divide each dimension by 300 (if you are working in inches) or 120 (if you are working in centimetres).

Here is a worked example:

An image's dimensions are 850 × 1100 pixels

Pixels/required resolution (300dpi) = Printable size

Divide pixels (or ‘dots’) by 300 to get the size it can be printed in inches:

(850/300) × (1100/300) = 2.8 × 3.7 inches

OR

Divide pixels (or ‘dots’) by 120 to get the size it can be printed in centimetres:

(850/120) × (1100/120) = 7.0 × 9.3 centimetres

For this example, as the printable size is less than 4 × 6 inches (10 × 15 centimetres), this photograph would need to be checked by an OUP Editor.

Tip! When sourcing photographs, think: does the image look professional and of high quality? Is the image clear? Does it add to the text? If your OUP Editor feels that the answer to any of these questions is no, then you will be asked to remove the photograph or find a replacement.

Originating your artwork

Our readers expect high-quality, original artwork. We encourage you to produce your own artwork without copying from another source. By originating artwork yourself you can also save time and money clearing permissions. Please follow these instructions:

Artwork type

Instruction

File types

Line art

Draw the figure clearly, neatly, and accurately, with instructions for the artist or typesetter (for example, how colour should be used, if applicable). Bear in mind that a third party will have to interpret any drawings in order to redraw them. Unless instructed otherwise, they will redraw artwork faithfully, in the OUP house style. If you are drawing line art using a specialist computer package, such as ChemDraw, please speak to your OUP Editor before you begin.

.doc, .ppt, .xls, .ai, .eps, scanned hardcopy drawing

Photographs

Use your own photographs only if they are of professional quality.
Check that you have a ‘high-resolution’ file: 300dpi with a measurement in print of at least 4 × 6 inches (or 10 × 15 centimetres).
If the photograph is of a person or is personal property of a third party, make sure the person or property owner has signed a letter granting you permission to print it.

.tiff, .jpeg

Combination artwork

These are pieces of artwork combining both line art and photographs (e.g. a labelled photograph). Follow the instructions for both line art and photographs. Using PowerPoint (or a similar program), please show how you wish the final image to appear by embedding the photograph into the diagram. You must also supply the photograph as a separate high-resolution file.

.tiff, .jpeg
and
.ppt, .doc

Sourcing your artwork

If you are not originating your own artwork, you will need to follow these instructions:

Artwork type

Instruction

File types

Line art

Submit a copy of the line art to be redrawn. If the line art is too complex to be redrawn, you will need to obtain the original (with a resolution of 600dpi at 4 × 6 inches (or 10 × 15 centimetres)) from the copyright holder.

Gain permission to use the line art by contacting the originator or copyright holder (see Copyright Permissions). Keep all correspondence, even if it is not replied to, and submit to your OUP Editor.

File types if artwork is being redrawn:
.doc, .ppt, .xls, .eps, .ai, scanned hardcopy drawing

File types if artwork is not being redrawn:
See the detailed Detailed artwork guidelines.

Photographs

Submit a high-resolution file: 300dpi with a measurement in print of at least 4 × 6 inches (or 10 × 15 centimetres). You will need to request it from the copyright holder.

Request and gain permission to publish (by following the process for line art above). Be aware that the copyright holder is not always the publisher; it can also be the photographer or artist.

Photographs may be sourced through a picture library or agency.

.tiff, .jpeg

Combination artwork

Submit a high-resolution file for the photo: 300dpi with a measurement in print of at least 4 × 6 inches (or 10 × 15 centimetres). You will need to request it from the copyright holder. Also supply a file showing how you wish the final image to appear.

Gain permission to use all of the elements that will make up the combination artwork.

File types: .tiff, .jpeg

and


.ppt, .doc

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