News

News

The latest updates about Oxford University Press around the world

New words for Australian National Dictionary

New words for Australian National Dictionary

08 September 2016

More than 6,000 new Australian words and phrases, including words from more than 100 indigenous languages, have been officially recognised with the release of the second edition of the Australian National Dictionary.

The Australian National Dictionary is the primary repository of Australian English and the custodian of words and phrases unique to Australian history and culture. It traces words and phrases, including slang and regional words, to their original sources, including books, newspapers and diaries. It is published by Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand (OUP) and compiled by the Australian National Dictionary Centre at The Australian National University (ANU).

Launched in Parliament House in August, the second edition is the first comprehensive update of the Australian National Dictionary since 1988. It now has definitions and the history of 16,000 words and phrases unique to Australia.

OUP Managing Director Peter van Noorden said the new edition was a crucial record of Australian culture and identity. “It is vital that these words be recorded. If language is a definer of nationhood and the character of a people, then this new edition illustrates what it means, in words, to be Australian,” he said.

Chief Editor Dr Bruce Moore, a former Australian National Dictionary Centre Director, said the new publication tells Australians about their history and values and how they have changed. “The dictionary shows how Australian words tell us much about Australian history and about Australian values and attitudes. Australian English is a marker of our national identity. The Australian National Dictionary is the essential cultural and historical document that maps the words that define who we are, where we have come from and what we value.”